Chemical tags likely to affect metabolism, cancer development

Feb 18, 2010
Chemical tags likely to affect metabolism, cancer development
This is Yue Xiong, Ph.D., of University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Credit: UNC Medical Center News Office

It is not unusual to hear people blame their metabolism after gaining a few pounds. But changes in metabolism - the process that shapes how our bodies turn food into energy -- can have much more sinister effects than making it hard to fit into your favorite jeans.

In fact, differences in metabolic rates are known to exist between normal cells and , though the mechanism behind it is unclear. Now new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill suggests that the addition or removal of a certain type of chemical tag - called an acetyl group - onto plays a key role in how is regulated.

The finding, which will appear in the February 19 issue of the journal Science, gives researchers vital clues to understand how normal cells respond to nutrient changes and how the process by which normal cells turn cancerous, and could one day lead to new drugs that starve into submission.

"We have discovered an entirely new layer of control of metabolism," said Yue Xiong, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry and biophysics and a member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. "This process -- the of metabolic enzymes -- appears to be highly conserved during evolution and very dynamic, which makes it an ideal target for future drug development. Now if we can identify which enzyme or enzymes are responsible for the difference in metabolism between normal and tumor cells, then we could have new targets for the treating cancer patients."

Xiong is a senior author of the study along with Kun-Liang Guan, professor of pharmacology, at the University of California, San Diego.

Almost all previous studies on acetylation have focused on the proteins in the nucleus, where acetyl tags regulate how tightly the DNA's genetic code is packaged. But Xiong and Guan started this study with the hypothesis that acetylation must also play a role in the other half of the cell, the cytoplasm.

So they separated the nucleus and the cytoplasm of primary liver cells, and then took a chemical census of the cytoplasm's contents using a technology called mass spectroscopy. They identified approximately a thousand new proteins that are acetylated, greatly expanding the previously recognized repertoire of fifty.

At first, the researchers were overwhelmed by such a large number of proteins to study, said Xiong. But then they began notice a pattern -- almost every metabolic enzyme was acetylated, presumably because their starting material was liver, an organ rich in metabolic activity.

"We think that acetylation is likely to play a very extensive role in regulation of many different cellular processes, not just metabolism," said Xiong.

Xiong and his colleagues looked at the acetylation of one enzyme from each of the four major metabolic pathways. They found that by altering the metabolic fuels that feed into these pathways they could alter the level of acetylation.

In addition, the researchers discovered that blocking acetylation chemically or genetically affected these metabolic enzymes in a number of different ways, either by stimulating its activity, inhibiting it, or degrading the protein itself. They suspect that acetylation is important for coordinating not only the players within a metabolic pathway but also between different pathways.

The next step is to take their finding in normal cells and see how it can inform their study of tumor cells. The researchers are in the process of looking at each metabolic enzyme, one-by-one, to see which one displays the most disparate acetylation patterns between normal and cancer cells. They will then try to use the very same proteins that tack on or pull off those acetyl groups - called acetylases or deacetylases, respectively -- to modify acetylation and thwart development.

Explore further: First vital step in fertilization between sperm and egg discovered

Related Stories

Researchers make major signal transduction discovery

Oct 04, 2007

The chemical process known as acetylation plays a central role in cytokine receptor signal transduction – a fundamental biochemical cascade inside cells that controls the activity of antiviral and tumor-suppressing genes.

Scientists locate disease switches

Jul 17, 2009

A team of scientists from the University of Copenhagen and the Max Planck Institute in Germany, has identified no less than 3,600 molecular switches in the human body. These switches, which regulate protein functions, may ...

Starve a yeast, sweeten its lifespan

Mar 24, 2009

Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered a new energy-making biochemical twist in determining the lifespan of yeast cells, one so valuable to longevity that it is likely to also functions in humans.

Recommended for you

Researchers transplant regenerated oesophagus

Apr 15, 2014

Tissue engineering has been used to construct natural oesophagi, which in combination with bone marrow stem cells have been safely and effectively transplanted in rats. The study, published in Nature Communications, shows ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

HIV+ women respond well to HPV vaccine

HIV-positive women respond well to a vaccine against the human papillomavirus (HPV), even when their immune system is struggling, according to newly published results of an international clinical trial. The study's findings ...

Progress in the fight against quantum dissipation

(Phys.org) —Scientists at Yale have confirmed a 50-year-old, previously untested theoretical prediction in physics and improved the energy storage time of a quantum switch by several orders of magnitude. ...

Revealing camouflaged bacteria

A research team at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has discovered an protein family that plays a central role in the fight against the bacterial pathogen Salmonella within the cells. The so cal ...