FDA issues warning on 4 widely-used asthma drugs

Feb 18, 2010 By LAURAN NEERGAARD , AP Medical Writer

(AP) -- The government is issuing new restrictions on some widely used long-acting asthma drugs, saying they should never be used without other asthma controllers to prevent a lifethreatening risk.

Four medications - Foradil, Serevent, Advair and Symbicort - contain an ingredient that relaxes muscles in the lung's airways. While they're very helpful for some patients, the way they work also may mask symptoms that can trigger serious attacks. It's a particular concern for children.

The ordered new labels saying the drugs should be used for the shortest possible duration - and only together with other medications such as inhaled steroids that work differently, by relieving airway inflammation.

Explore further: Seniors successfully withdraw from meds

5 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Asthma risk increases in children treated for HIV

Jul 01, 2008

Children whose immune systems rebound after treatment with potent anti-viral drugs for HIV infection face an increased risk of developing asthma, said a federally funded consortium of researchers led by those from Baylor ...

More pounds equals worse asthma?

May 22, 2007

A new study presented at the American Thoracic Society 2007 International Conference finds that obese people are significantly more likely to have persistent or severe persistent asthma than their thinner counterparts.

Recommended for you

Seniors successfully withdraw from meds

9 hours ago

Elderly people have proved receptive to being de-prescribed medications, as part of a trial aimed at assessing the feasibility of withdrawal of medications among older people.

Flu vaccine for expectant moms a top priority

Sep 18, 2014

Only about half of all pregnant women in the U.S. get a flu shot each season, leaving thousands of moms-to-be and their babies at increased risk of serious illness.

Experts want restrictions on testosterone drug use (Update)

Sep 17, 2014

Federal health experts said Wednesday there is little evidence that testosterone-boosting drugs are effective for treating common signs of aging in men and that their use should be narrowed to exclude millions of Americans ...

User comments : 0