Helmets must be part of skiing and snowboarding culture, doctors urge

Feb 17, 2010

While the world's best skiers and snowboarders at the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games compete with helmets on, many other skiers and snowboarders are choosing to forego this important piece of safety equipment. In fact, many skiers and snowboarders place fashion before safety, according to a commentary by a St. Michael's Hospital neurosurgeon published in the Journal of the American Medical Association today.

The commentary calls for skiers to shun the cultural stigma or fashion faux pas associated with wearing helmets to encourage helmet use as a routine part of the ski and snowboard culture.

Head injuries in these two alpine sports are the most frequent cause of hospital admission and death. Research shows that about 120,000 people in North America suffer head injuries while skiing or snowboarding each year. Recent studies have shown that helmets help reduce the risk of head injuries by up to 60 percent.

"Despite compelling evidence that shows wearing a helmet significantly reduces the chance of head and brain injury, there are still those who argue that helmets are not fashionable or part of the ski culture," explains Dr. Michael Cusimano, a neurosurgeon at St. Michael's Hospital. "We have established the safety benefits but now we must find ways to integrate helmets so it becomes another piece of standard equipment for people on the slopes. It is time for everyone who has a stake in skiing and snowboarding to do their part to make the slopes safer."

According to the authors, a shift in attitude toward helmet use is necessary to quash cultural stigmas. They say that change has already begun. For example, during the 2009 National Ski Safety Week, ski areas in California, Colorado and Washington offered discounts on helmets through the Lid for Kids safety awareness program. Other resorts are including a helmet with their child and youth ski and snowboard rental packages.

"Resorts have two reasons for promoting helmets - one, it keeps their customers safer and two, they are also seeing a discount in their insurance premiums when the slopes are safer places," says Dr. Cusimano. "Role modeling can also have a powerful effect on what people sense as normal. Ski patrollers and instructors understand that helmets lessen the risk of traumatic and view themselves as role models for the public; however, most do not wear helmets regularly."

The authors recommend:

  • All ski and snowboard advertising images include people wearing helmets
  • Public Service Announcements featuring well-known athletes promoting healthy physical activity
  • Parents wearing helmets to promote the practice with their kids
  • Formal instruction aimed at ski resorts, schools and novice skiers offered through groups such as, Think First and the National Ski Areas Association, need to be included in any campaign to make the slopes safer.
"We are on the brink of changing the culture in skiing and snowboarding towards ," he says. "What we need is action by various stakeholders so wearing a helmet no longer becomes a fashion decision but rather common sense. We need action from national organizations, to ski resorts and schools, to parents and kids to make this culture shift. At that point, we will make real progress in reducing the number of on the slopes."

Explore further: Christmas a risky time for vulnerable according to indigenous expert

Provided by St. Michael's Hospital

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Skiers look at their back yard, not slopes

Dec 11, 2007

A study suggested that U.S. skiers are less likely to head to the slopes if their backyards are snow-free, despite how much snow is reported at ski areas.

Head injuries increase after motorcycle helmet law repeal

Jun 12, 2008

Pennsylvania motorcyclists suffered large increases in head injury deaths and hospitalizations in the two years following the repeal of its motorcycle helmet law, according to a University of Pittsburgh study to be published ...

Recommended for you

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Migweld
not rated yet Feb 17, 2010
While I agree that there are many people still on the slopes without helmets, I believe that the cultural shift towards securing the noggin has already happened. Within the relatively large group (approx. 50 members ) that I ride with on an annual holiday, I would say a good proportion (70% or so) of them wear helmets. Furthermore, within the group I ride with regularly, nobody is seen without one.

The manufacturers are certainly combating the fashion faux pas argument, with industry leaders such as Bern and R.E.D producing stylish, subtle lids without compromising on safety. Pro riders are also helping by constantly being seen wearing helmets in videos; although some still choose to rock the beanie in their sections, the shift is towards protecting themselves and looking good at the same time.

Snowboarding is still seen as a reckless sport but given the choice of braining myself on a rock or bouncing of it, unharmed, I know which I'd choose!

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.