Blood clotting finding may lead to new treatments

Feb 10, 2010

A key protein that causes the blood to clot is produced by blood vessels in the lungs and not just the liver, according to new research published today in the journal PLoS One, led by scientists at Imperial College London.

The findings may ultimately help scientists to develop better treatments for conditions where the blood's ability to clot is impaired, including deep vein , where dangerous form inside the body, and haemophilia A, where the blood cannot clot sufficiently well.

It has long been known that an agent called factor VIII plays a key role in enabling the blood to clot. Too much factor VIII puts people at risk of excessive clots. Low levels of factor VIII cause bleeding in people with haemophilia A and factor VIII replacement is used to treat this.

Prior to recent research it had been believed that most factor VIII was produced by the liver. Therapeutic options for patients with haemophilia have included replacing , for example through transplantation.

Dr Claire Shovlin, the lead author of the study from the National Heart and Lung Institute at Imperial College London, said: "Our study suggests that the blood vessels in the lung are playing a crucial role in altering how blood clots form in the body. There are a huge number of these blood vessels - they cover an area equivalent in size to a squash court, effectively 20 times the surface area of all other blood vessels combined.

"This means it's really important for us to understand exactly how the behaviour of the lung blood vessels might be affecting diseases where blood clotting is a factor. Further research on how the lungs modify the clotting potential of the blood flowing through them could open up new avenues for treatments," added Dr Shovlin.

In 2006, researchers from the University of Leuven in Belgium published a study in the looking at donated lung tissue. The researchers passed fluid through the tissue and found that in three of the four lung samples studied, the levels of factor VIII increased in the fluid after passing through the lungs. They also provided evidence that some lung blood vessels could produce factor VIII in cell culture.

The researchers behind today's study have confirmed that the in the lungs should be an important site for regulating the formation of clots, both in the lungs themselves and also, potentially, in the rest of the body. They used different microscopic and biochemical techniques to look at samples of lung tissue and blood samples in minute detail.

Tissue and blood samples for the work leading up to this study were donated by patients from Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, with tissue processed through the Hammersmith Hospital Tissue Bank.

The team found that factor VIII could be seen in the lung tissue and was present on the surface of blood vessel cells in the lungs. They also found that factor VIII localises in the lungs with a protein called von Willebrand factor, which protects factor VIII from degradation. The work also showed that how the factor VIII gene may be decoded is much more complicated than previously thought. This could potentially alter how scientists approach the treatment of the many conditions where blood clotting is a factor.

The researchers hope that ultimately new drugs can be developed that target production of in the lungs, to improve the body's ability to ensure that the blood clots properly. By targeting the lungs, the researchers think it may be possible to make more effective drugs that produce fewer side effects than current treatments.

Explore further: Mutant protein in muscle linked to neuromuscular disorder

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Redesigned protein accelerates blood clotting

Dec 22, 2008

Researchers have made several, subtle changes in the structure of a key protein, dramatically increasing its ability to drive blood clotting, according to a study published in a December edition of the Journal of Thrombosis an ...

Premature babies have altered sensory responses in later life

Dec 22, 2008

Premature infants who need intensive care or surgery are less sensitive to thermal (hot and cold) sensations later in life, according to research conducted at UCL (University College London). The study, published in the journal ...

Newly discovered mechanism by which blood clots form

Dec 10, 2009

Polyphosphate from blood platelets plays a key role in inflammation and the formation of blood clots, scientists from the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet have shown. The study, which is presented in the prestigious ...

Recommended for you

Gate for bacterial toxins found

5 hours ago

Prof. Dr. Dr. Klaus Aktories and Dr. Panagiotis Papatheodorou from the Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology of the University of Freiburg have discovered the receptor responsible ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Down's chromosome cause genome-wide disruption

The extra copy of Chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome throws a spanner into the workings of all the other chromosomes as well, said a study published Wednesday that surprised its authors.

How kids' brain structures grow as memory develops

Our ability to store memories improves during childhood, associated with structural changes in the hippocampus and its connections with prefrontal and parietal cortices. New research from UC Davis is exploring ...

Ebola virus in Africa outbreak is a new strain

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain—evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.