Stiff wind delays NASA launch of solar observatory

Feb 10, 2010 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer

(AP) -- Gusty wind has forced NASA to delay the launch of its newest solar observatory.

An unmanned Atlas V rocket was supposed to blast off from on Wednesday morning with the Solar Dynamics Observatory. NASA put off the launch for an hour, hoping the wind would ease. But the rocket's systems sensed a wind overload and shut everything down, with just three minutes and 59 seconds left in the countdown.

says it will try again Thursday to send up the observatory. It's the most advanced probe ever built to study the sun. Scientists want to better understand the violent that causes communication and power disruptions on Earth.

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