Researchers publish promising findings for advanced cervical cancer

Feb 09, 2010

Researchers at the Ireland Cancer Center of University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center, have published new findings that may lead to a new standard of care for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

Published in the February issue of Clinical Research, the phase one study found that a new chemotherapy medicine, Triapine, was well tolerated in combination with standard-of-care cisplatin chemotherapy and radiation treatment in women with . This regimen provided both significant reduction in cancer disease and cancer control.

"This new drug, which suppresses , shows a great deal of promise for cervical cancer patients who are at high risk for relapse and cancer-related death," says Charles Kunos, MD, Primary Investigator of the study, Director of Gynecologic at UH Case Medical Center and Assistant Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "In this ten-patient study, a 100% complete response rate was observed and no disease progression was documented through 18 months of median follow-up."

In the study, patients were treated three times weekly with Triapine in combination with weekly cisplatin treatment and daily pelvic over five weeks. A phase two follow-up study is ongoing at the Ireland Cancer Center. UH Case Medical Center is the primary affiliate of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, a nationally recognized leader in medical research and education

"Cervical cancer affects half a million women worldwide each year," says Steven Waggoner, MD, Chief of Gynecologic Oncology at UH Case Medical Center and Assistant Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. "We are pleased to have found a promising new treatment to help women fight this aggressive disease."

Explore further: Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells

Provided by University Hospitals Case Medical Center

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Women with AIDS face cervical cancer threat

Nov 30, 2007

According to a report issued last week by UNAIDS, access to antiretroviral therapy is beginning to reduce AIDS mortality worldwide. But Dr. Groesbeck Parham, gynecologic oncologist and Director of the Cervical Cancer Prevention ...

Recommended for you

70-gene signature not cost-effective in breast cancer

Oct 18, 2014

(HealthDay)—For patients with node-negative breast cancer (NNBC), the 70-gene signature is unlikely to be cost-effective for guiding adjuvant chemotherapy decision making, according to a study published ...

User comments : 0