Flower power can still calm the masses

Feb 09, 2010

Feeling stressed? Try chamomile! This 'traditional' remedy has been around for years, but how much truth is there behind this old wives' tale?

In an evaluation for Faculty of 1000, Michael Van Ameringen and Beth Patterson draw attention to the first of chamomile for the treatment of (GAD).

The study, recently published in the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, reports that "chamomile extract therapy was found to be efficacious for mild-moderate GAD".

Patients with mild-moderate GAD were included in the study and received either chamomile or . Those that received the chamomile treatment were found to have a significant change in the severity of their GAD.

Van Amerigen and Patterson comment on the results of the study, saying that they "suggest that chamomile may have modest [anti-panic] activity in patients with mild-moderate GAD and may potentially be used in those who are averse to traditional ".

These findings are important "because many individuals who suffer from GAD do not view their anxiety as a medical condition, [and, therefore,] self-diagnosis and self-medicating with alternative, over-the-counter remedies is common".

Van Amerigen and Patterson said "a big strength of this paper is that the authors took a herbal remedy and subjected it to scientific rigor unlike many 'natural' remedies which have associated claims of efficacy with no supportive data."

Explore further: US aims to cut antibiotic use

Provided by Faculty of 1000: Biology and Medicine

5 /5 (1 vote)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Anxiety disorders surprisingly common yet often untreated

Mar 12, 2007

A new study by researchers led by Kurt Kroenke, M.D., of the Indiana University School of Medicine and the Regenstrief Institute, Inc. reports that nearly 20 percent of patients seen by primary care physicians have at least ...

Recommended for you

US aims to cut antibiotic use

Mar 27, 2015

US President Barack Obama on Friday rolled out plans to cut inappropriate antibiotic use by half, in an effort to tackle drug resistance.

Questions over value of new antibiotics to tackle resistance

Mar 26, 2015

In the first installment of a new series, Peter Doshi, Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy and Associate Editor at The BMJ, asks why authorities are approving drugs with little evidence they d ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.