Enhancing arrest of cell growth to treat cancer in mice

Feb 08, 2010

A team of researchers, led by Pier Paolo Pandolfi, at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, has identified a new type of cellular senescence (i.e., irreversible arrest of cell growth) and determined a way to enhance it to suppress prostate tumor development and growth in mice.

Previous work by Pandolfi and colleagues determined that inactivation of the protein Pten leads to a senescence response that opposes tumorigenesis.

In this study, Pten-loss-induced cellular senescence (PICS) was found to be distinct from another form of cellular senescence known as oncogene-induced senescence in that it did not cause cellular proliferation and . This was important because these two consequences of oncogene-induced senescence mean that enhancing this process for the treatment of cancer is not a viable option.

As pharmacological inhibition of PTEN was found to drive senescence and inhibit and growth in vivo in a human xenograft model of , the authors suggest that enhancing PICS might provide a new approach for cancer prevention and therapy.

Explore further: MR spectroscopy shows precancerous breast changes in women with BRCA gene

More information: A novel type of cellular senescence that can be enhanced in mouse models and human tumor xenografts to suppress prostate tumorigenesis. View this article at: www.jci.org/articles/view/4053… 9b25621b73ed2877356a

Provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation

4 /5 (2 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Preventing cancer without killing cells

Mar 30, 2007

Inducing senescence in aged cells may be sufficient to guard against spontaneous cancer development, according to a paper published online this week in EMBO reports. It was previously unknown whether cellular senescence or ...

DNA damage response confers a barrier for viral tumorigenesis

Sep 28, 2007

Kaposi’s sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human tumor virus and an etiological agent for Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS). KSHV infection is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa where KS is nowadays the most common malignancy, due to widespread ...

Blocking beta1-integrin to treat cancer

Jun 06, 2007

Targeting the function of a protein known as beta1-integrin might represent a novel approach to cancer treatment, according to a paper published online in The EMBO Journal this week. Blocking the action of this protein could ...

Rheb's role in cancer

Aug 14, 2008

Two independent papers in the August 15th issue of G&D identify the Rheb GTPase as a novel oncogene and a promising new chemotherapeutic target.

Recommended for you

US women's awareness of breast density varies

10 hours ago

Disparities in the level of awareness and knowledge of breast density exist among U.S. women, according to the results of a Mayo Clinic study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Study shows why some brain cancers resist treatment

10 hours ago

Scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center may have discovered why some brain cancer patients develop resistance to standard treatments including radiation and the chemotherapy agent temozolomide.

Researchers identify genes responsible for lung tumors

12 hours ago

The lung transcription factor Nkx2-1 is an important gene regulating lung formation and normal respiratory functions after birth. Alterations in the expression of this transcription factor can lead to diseases such as lung ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.