Fish oil not snake oil

Jan 18, 2010

A randomised controlled trial of fish oil given intravenously to patients in intensive care has found that it improves gas exchange, reduces inflammatory chemicals and results in a shorter length of hospital stay. Researchers writing in BioMed Central's open access journal Critical Care investigated the effects of including fish oil in the normal nutrient solution for patients with sepsis, finding a significant series of benefits.

Philip Calder, from the University of Southampton, UK, worked with a team of researchers to carry out the study in 23 patients with syndrome or in the Hospital Padre Américo, Portugal. He said, "Recently there has been increased interest in the fat and oil component of vein-delivered nutrition, with the realization that it not only supplies energy and essential building blocks, but may also provide bioactive fatty acids.

Traditional solutions use soybean oil, which does not contain the omega-3 fatty acids contained in that act to reduce inflammatory responses. In fact, soybean oil is rich in omega-6 acids that may actually promote inflammation in an excessive or unbalanced supply".

Calder and his colleagues found that the 13 patients in the fish oil group had lower levels of inflammatory agents in their blood, were able to achieve better lung function and left hospital earlier than the 10 patients who received traditional nutrition. According to Calder, "This is the first study of this particular fish oil solution in septic patients in the ICU. The positive results are important since they indicate that the use of such an emulsion in this group of patients will improve clinical outcomes, in comparison with the standard mix".

Explore further: Off-season doesn't allow brain to recover from football hits, study says

More information: Effects of a fish oil containing lipid emulsion on plasma phospholipid fatty acids, inflammatory markers, and clinical outcomes in septic patients: a randomized, controlled clinical trial, Vera M Barbosa, Elizabeth A Miles, Conceicao Calhau, Estevao Lafuente and Philip C Calder, Critical Care (in press), ccforum.com/

Related Stories

Fish oil may help kidney disease sufferers

Apr 30, 2007

Fish oil, it's been touted as an answer to Alzheimers, arthritis and even weight-loss but now a Queensland University of Technology researcher will test its health benefits in people with chronic kidney disease.

Fish oil -- helpful or harmful?

Jan 14, 2008

Fish oil supplements may help some cardiac patients while harming others, suggests a new review of evidence compiled by St. Michael’s Hospital and University of Toronto researchers.

Recommended for you

US judge overturns state's abortion law (Update)

4 hours ago

A federal judge on Wednesday overturned a North Dakota law banning abortions when a fetal heartbeat can be detected, as early as six weeks into pregnancy and before many women know they're pregnant.

Changing cows' diet could help tackle heart disease

8 hours ago

Adding oilseed to a cow's diet can significantly reduce the harmful saturated fat found in its milk without compromising the white stuff's nutritional benefits, according to research by the University of ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

roninca
not rated yet Feb 28, 2010
The over consumption of omega-6 oils can not be overstated. It is estimated that the average western diet gets a ratio of up to 20:1 omega-6 to omega-3. This imbalance is huge when considering a more idea ratio would be closer to 2:1. Point being, most diets need far less omega-6, and far more omega-3.

http://www.omega3-fishoil.org/

More news stories

Down's chromosome cause genome-wide disruption

The extra copy of Chromosome 21 that causes Down's syndrome throws a spanner into the workings of all the other chromosomes as well, said a study published Wednesday that surprised its authors.

Researchers see hospitalization records as additional tool

Comparing hospitalization records with data reported to local boards of health presents a more accurate way to monitor how well communities track disease outbreaks, according to a paper published April 16 in the journal PLOS ON ...

Ebola virus in Africa outbreak is a new strain

The Ebola virus that has killed scores of people in Guinea this year is a new strain—evidence that the disease did not spread there from outbreaks in some other African nations, scientists report.