Seagate Super Speeds Transfer Rates With USB 3.0 External Portable Hard Drive

Jan 08, 2010

Today at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Seagate unveiled the BlackArmor PS110 USB 3.0 portable external hard drive performance kit for notebook computers.

This all-in-one USB 3.0 toolkit packages a 500GB 7200RPM 2.5-inch portable , power cable and PC express card, to deliver real-world, proven speeds up to three times faster than its USB 2.0 predecessor, making it one of the fastest portable hard drives available. USB 3.0 speed has been specified at 4.8 Gbs per second or a ten times improvement over USB 2.0, however this is theoretical performance, and the new Seagate BlackArmor USB 3.0 portable drive achieves 3X performance over USB 2.0 in real world testing.

To address these growing storage needs, the BlackArmor PS110 USB 3.0 toolkit makes it easier and less time-consuming to store and share large amounts of rich digital content. This new super speed USB 3.0 interface allows easy transfer of large files to and from the external drive at sustained transfer rates of 100MB/s, which is three times faster than current USB 2.0 devices. The familiar scenario of waiting for large files to transfer will now be a thing of the past.

With the BlackArmor PS 110 USB 3.0 drive, a 25GB HD movie can be transferred in just four minutes versus the 14 minutes it would take using a traditional USB 2.0 drive. Simply plug the PC Adapter card into a notebook, connect one end of the included adapter cord to the PC card, the other end to the BlackArmor PS110 drive, and it is set.

Considering the precious, personal content and portability of today’s external hard drives, it is important for people to give thought to protecting the data on the drive. Seagate’s USB 3.0 portable hard drive performance kit couples all the safety and security of the existing BlackArmor PS 110 portable hard drive with the increased performance of USB 3.0 in an exceptionally slim, 12.5mm form factor. Each drive ships with the Acronis b usiness-grade backup suite, automated full-system backup and SafetyDrill+ software, a bare metal recovery feature, is Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7 compatible and covered by the an industry-leading, 5 year limited warranty.

The BlackArmor PS110 USB 3.0 performance kit contains everything you need to upgrade your laptop to take advantage of USB 3.0 speeds. The new BlackArmor PS 110 USB 3.0 Performance kit is backwards compatible with USB 2.0 and can be purchased immediately from Seagate.com for a manufacturer’s suggested retail price of $179.99.

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User comments : 8

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Yes
1 / 5 (2) Jan 08, 2010
Is there growing storage need?
I think we can store more than we want.
On my laptop I can store easily 20 full time movies that I probably will never look at.
My definition of a modal harddisk:
A cemetery of data!
When was the last time that you went to see the grave of your dead granny or dads?
MorituriMax
not rated yet Jan 08, 2010
How about when you convert all 347 of the movies you own and want them on your home network so you can stream them to your XBox 360?

Or you have 157 GB of music and podcasts?

So just because YOU only have 20 movies, that doesn't mean everyone else is like you. I have more than 20 movies on my laptop for pete's sake because it is an awesome movie and media player that I take with me, and the fact that I only have 500GB of storage on there is bad.
jimbo92107
not rated yet Jan 09, 2010
I used to have about 12GB of music files. I don't even know where it is anymore. I don't care. Same with movies. Why bother when most movies are crap, and even good ones aren't worth seeing more than a couple times?

I am beginning to prefer that hi-rez 3D interface that allows full sensory input and dynamic, interactive scenarios. Very life-like!
NeptuneAD
not rated yet Jan 09, 2010
Always wanting more storage space, imagine trying to store 500GB of music, 4TB of movies and 2TB of TV shows on DVDs.

USB 3.0 sounds good, transfer speeds are always a huge issue, nobody likes waiting around all day for files to be copied, plus being USB it will become common on computers unlike eSata.

John_balls
not rated yet Jan 09, 2010
Is there growing storage need?
I think we can store more than we want.
On my laptop I can store easily 20 full time movies that I probably will never look at.
My definition of a modal harddisk:
A cemetery of data!
When was the last time that you went to see the grave of your dead granny or dads?

what are u crazy?? Have you ever heard of home videos?? Have you ever heard of HD home video recordings??
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Jan 10, 2010
what are u crazy?? Have you ever heard of home videos?? Have you ever heard of HD home video recordings??


And I bet you haven't watched more than 20 of the movies in your collection over the past year (and that the vast majority of your collection of movies is gathering digital dust and will likely never be touched again).

As someone else already said: Large HDs are nothing but data crypts.
John_balls
not rated yet Jan 10, 2010
what are u crazy?? Have you ever heard of home videos?? Have you ever heard of HD home video recordings??


And I bet you haven't watched more than 20 of the movies in your collection over the past year (and that the vast majority of your collection of movies is gathering digital dust and will likely never be touched again).

As someone else already said: Large HDs are nothing but data crypts.

Speak for yourself ,don't speak for me.
RayCherry
not rated yet Jan 12, 2010
Regardless of what you decide to keep, or decide to (delete? better not, just in case) archive, Microsoft and Co. will always find use for available disk space, for installation and update files, temporary files, Internet cache files, restore files, configuration files, and seldom used backward compatibility files. Also, those must keep files left behind by every uninstall. The way that modern OS's creep over your primary harddisk, you will find more of 'your' documents and media files moving to USB external storage.

Too much disk? Too little control?