New record in the area of prime number decomposition of cryptographically important numbers

Jan 08, 2010 by Florence Luy

An international team of scientists from EPFL (Switzerland), INRIA (France), NTT (Japan), CWI (The Netherlands) and Bonn University (Germany), has obtained the prime factors of the RSA challenge number RSA-768, using the Number Field Sieve.

The calculation took less than 2000 core years on modern CPUs.

Extrapolating the trend from previous records in this area (512-bit in 1999, 663-bit in 2005, and the current 768-bit in 2009), it is reasonable to expect that 1024-bit keys will exhibit a similar degree of vulnerability within the next decade.

The result thus underlines the importance to adopt the new cryptographic key size standards that recommend phasing out usage of currently popular 1024-bit RSA keys. However, it also indicates that, assuming similar resources, users do not incur undue risks by continued usage of 1024-bit RSA keys during the next few years of transition to higher security levels.

The software used was to a considerable extent based on a package developed in the early 2000s at the Institute at Bonn University, and further developed by the present collaborators. EPFL's Laboratory for Cryptologic Algorithms acted as main organizer, central data collection point, and contributed approximately a third to the overall computational effort.

Explore further: Mathematical model tackles 'Game of Thrones' predictions

More information:
-- Paper: documents.epfl.ch/users/l/le/l… ic/papers/rsa768.txt
-- General number field sieve: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_number_field_sieve
-- RSA Factoring Challenge: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RSA_Challenge

Provided by Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne

4.2 /5 (5 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Fighting tomorrow's hackers

Feb 05, 2009

One of the themes of Dan Brown's The Da Vinci Code is the need to keep vital and sensitive information secure. Today, we take it for granted that most of our information is safe because it's encrypted. Every time we use a ...

Recommended for you

Are the world's religions ready for ET?

1 hour ago

In 1930, Albert Einstein was asked for his opinion about the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe. "Other beings, perhaps, but not men," he answered. Then he was asked whether science and religion ...

How dinosaur arms turned into bird wings

1 hour ago

Although we now appreciate that birds evolved from a branch of the dinosaur family tree, a crucial adaptation for flight has continued to puzzle evolutionary biologists. During the millions of years that elapsed, wrists went ...

Mathematical model tackles 'Game of Thrones' predictions

3 hours ago

Take events from the past, build a statistical model, and tell the future. Why not apply the formula to novels? Can contents in future books be predicted based only on data from existing ones? Richard Vale ...

User comments : 0