Study Finds Greater Risk of Brain Aneurysms in People with Aortic Aneurysms

Jan 04, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Yale School of Medicine researchers have found that people suffering from thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) may be at significantly greater risk of having an intracranial aneurysm (ICA) at the same time.

Their study appears in the online edition of The at http://www.ajconline.org/inpress .

The team, led by John Elefteriades, M.D., chief of , studied 212 patients who had undergone TAA repair in the period from 1997 to 2009. They found that those with TAA were nine times more likely than those in the general population to have intracranial () aneurysms at the same time.

Location also played a role in the increased risk; if the aneurysm was in the descending aorta, the risk of having a concurrent ICA was nearly five-fold greater than in patients with TAA in the ascending aorta.

“Descending aneurysms are arteriosclerotic, like aneurysms elsewhere in the body, including those in the abdomen, so it make sense that both and aneurysms would be seen in another organ as well,” said Elefteriades. “Aneurysms in the ascending aorta do not result from the fatty buildup of , but rather result from genetically weak aortic tissue.”

Hypertension also increased the prevalence of both kinds of aneurysms—thoracic and brain -- at the same time. Nearly 12% of patients with hypertension had both TAA and ICA, as opposed to less than 2% of those with normal blood pressure. Smoking also increased the risk.

Brain hemorrhage after an ICA rupture has been associated with high death rates. Forty percent of patients die within one month, and 30 percent of the survivors have persistent neurologic problems. In contrast, the rate of adverse outcomes after treatment of unruptured ICAs is as low as 1%.

“Our study showed that people with TAA should be screened for possible ,” Elefteriades said. “We know they are at substantially greater risk, and if we catch the before it ruptures, we can save lives and prevent devastating loss of function.”

Explore further: Scientists find new calorie-burning switch in brown fat

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Aneurysms don't occur earlier in second generation

Feb 23, 2009

People whose parents or aunts and uncles have had a brain aneurysm are more likely to have one themselves, indicating that genetic risk factors passed down by generation are responsible. Prior studies had suggested that ...

Routine testing after aneurysm coiling carries low risk

Nov 18, 2008

A very low risk of complication is associated with a routine test that determines whether a brain aneurysm treated with endovascular coiling has started to recur, a study led by the University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute ...

Recommended for you

Clues to curbing obesity found in neuronal 'sweet spot'

2 hours ago

Preventing weight gain, obesity, and ultimately diabetes could be as simple as keeping a nuclear receptor from being activated in a small part of the brain, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine ...

Small RNAs in blood may reveal heart injury

12 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—Like clues to a crime, specific molecules in the body can hint at exposure to toxins, infectious agents or even trauma, and so help doctors determine whether and how to treat a patient. ...

User comments : 0