The need for cardio-oncology: Treating cancer and protecting the heart

Dec 10, 2009

Cardiologists and oncologists must work together in an attempt to avoid or prevent adverse cardiovascular effects in patients from certain chemotherapies, especially for those who may be at a higher risk for such effects, according to a new review published online December 10 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

With an aging population, it is highly probable that an increasing number of people may have both and cardiovascular disease. Many chemotherapeutic and drugs affect the cardiovascular system, making cardiovascular side effects a new challenge in cancer therapy.

In a review of the literature, Adriana Albini, Ph.D., Chief of Oncology Research of the Clinical and Research Institute MultiMedica, Milan, Italy, Francesco Donatelli, Chief of MultiMedica Cardiovascular Department, and others from the Universities of Milan, Genova and Varese, summarize the potential cardiovascular toxicities for a range of cancer chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents and emphasize the importance of evaluating cardiovascular risk before patients are treated. They also stress the need to develop guidelines that include collateral effects on the cardiovascular system, as well as a new interdisciplinary field that could be termed "cardio-oncology."

Identification of high-risk patients, by way of new biomarkers, for example, and imaging techniques will be a key strategy to reduce morbidity and mortality, according to the authors. Approaches include screening on entry into clinical trials for both cancer therapy and prevention, helping in choice of therapy, and use of agents that prevent cardiotoxicity. Finally, assessment of cardiotoxicity in phase I trials to develop new agents with less risk is of paramount importance.

"Today's oncologists must be fully aware of cardiovascular risks to avoid or prevent adverse cardiovascular effects, and cardiologists must now be ready to assist oncologists by performing evaluations relevant to the choice of therapy," the authors write.

Source: (news : web)

Explore further: Breast cancer treatments more effective now than in the past

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Ibuprofen puts high risk cardiac patients at risk

Apr 05, 2007

Doctors who treat the painful condition of osteoarthritis in patients with increased cardiovascular risk need to be cautious. A team lead by researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, are the first to study outcomes in ...

Recommended for you

Gene test aids cancer profile

8 hours ago

The first round of chemotherapy did little to suppress Ron Bose's leukemia. The second round, with 10 times the dose, knocked the proliferating blast cells down, but only by half.

How a common antacid could lead to cheaper anti-cancer drugs

Nov 26, 2014

A popular indigestion medication can increase survival in colorectal cancer, according to research published in ecancermedicalscience. But in fact, scientists have studied this for years - and a group of cancer advocates want t ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.