Childhood cancer survivor study report: Late recurrence is a risk for some cancers

Dec 04, 2009

Late recurrence is a risk for some pediatric cancers, particularly Ewing sarcomas and tumors of the central nervous system, according to a new study published online December 4 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

This study was undertaken because there is limited research on late recurrence (after 5 years and up to 20 years) for pediatric cancer patients.

Karen Wasilewski-Masker, M.D., of the Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Service, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite, and colleagues analyzed data from the Survivor Study for 12,795 five-year survivors of the most common pediatric cancers. Cumulative incidence of late recurrence at 5, 10, 15, and 20 years after diagnosis was calculated using death as a competing risk.

The overall pediatric cancer recurrence rate was 4.4% at 10 years and 6.2% at 20 years among 5-year survivors. Thirteen percent of Ewing sarcomas and 14.4% of astrocytomas had recurred by 20 years. Only 0.9% of pediatric kidney tumors, 2.4% of Non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and 2.6% of neuroblastomas had recurred in 5 year-survivors by 20 years after treatment.

"Future research is needed to determine the risk of recurrence in subgroups of survivors and the cost-effectiveness of long-term disease surveillance in at-risk patient groups because these factors need to be considered in long-term follow-up and transitional care plans," the authors write.

Source: Journal of the National Institute (news : web)

Explore further: Pain and itch may be signs of skin cancer

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

U of MN study finds children with leukemia are living longer

Dec 11, 2006

More than 90 percent of children and young adults who survive five years or longer after diagnosis and treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are alive 20 years later and leading productive lives, according to a University ...

Recommended for you

Pain and itch may be signs of skin cancer

9 hours ago

Asking patients if a suspicious skin lesion is painful or itchy may help doctors decide whether the spot is likely to be cancerous, according to a new study headed by Gil Yosipovitch, MD, Chairman of the Department of Dermatology ...

Genetics of cancer: Non-coding DNA can finally be decoded

13 hours ago

Cancer is a disease of the genome resulting from a combination of genetic modifications (or mutations). We inherit from our parents strong or weak predispositions to developing certain kinds of cancer; in addition, we also ...

User comments : 0