Large Hadron Collider sets new power world record

Nov 30, 2009
CERN control center.

(PhysOrg.com) -- CERN's Large Hadron Collider has today become the world's highest energy particle accelerator, having accelerated its twin beams of protons to an energy of 1.18 TeV in the early hours of the morning. This exceeds the previous world record of 0.98 TeV, which had been held by the US Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory’s Tevatron collider since 2001. It marks another important milestone on the road to first physics at the LHC in 2010.

“We are still coming to terms with just how smoothly the commissioning is going,” said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer. “It is fantastic. However, we are continuing to take it step by step, and there is still a lot to do before we start physics in 2010. I’m keeping my champagne on ice until then.”

These developments come just 10 days after the LHC restart. First beams were injected into the LHC on Friday 20 November. Over the following days, the machine’s operators circulated beams around the ring alternately in one direction and then the other at the injection of 450 GeV, gradually increasing the beam lifetime to around 10 hours. On Monday 23 November, two beams circulated together for the first time, and the four big LHC detectors recorded their first collision data.

Last night’s achievement brings further confirmation that the LHC is progressing smoothly towards the objective of first physics early in 2010. The energy was first broken yesterday evening, when beam 1 was accelerated from 450 GeV, reaching 1050 GeV (1.05 TeV) at 21:48, Sunday 29 November. Three hours later both LHC beams were successfully accelerated to 1.18 TeV, at 00:44, 30 November.

“I was here 20 years ago when we switched on ’s last major particle accelerator, LEP,” said Accelerators and Technology Director Steve Myers. “I thought that was a great machine to operate, but this is something else. What took us days or weeks with LEP, we’re doing in hours with the LHC. So far, it all augurs well for a great research programme.”

Next on the schedule is a concentrated commissioning phase aimed at increasing the beam intensity before delivering good quantities of collision data to the experiments before Christmas. So far, all the LHC commissioning work has been carried out with a low intensity pilot beam. Higher intensity is needed to provide meaningful proton-proton collision rates. The current commissioning phase aims to make sure that these higher intensities can be safely handled and that stable conditions can be guaranteed for the experiments during collisions. This phase is estimated to take around a week, after which the LHC will be colliding beams for calibration purposes until the end of the year.

First physics at the LHC is scheduled for the first quarter of 2010, at a collision energy of 7 TeV (3.5 TeV per beam).

Provided by CERN

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User comments : 14

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nuge
5 / 5 (2) Nov 30, 2009
“We are still coming to terms with just how smoothly the LHC commissioning is going,” said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer.


...Is he serious?
pseudophonist
4.2 / 5 (5) Nov 30, 2009

...Is he serious?


Research is like that. Most times you expect something not to be working correctly when you start an experiment, even if its only your understanding.
omatumr
1 / 5 (6) Nov 30, 2009
Bragging rights.

Yes he is serious.

And probably also looking for something positive to report about the LHC.

If you were one of the thousands of employees at LHC, idled repeatedly by technical difficulties, you would probably also be looking for something positive to report to the taxpayers who financed this (mis)adventure.

�We are still coming to terms with just how smoothly the LHC commissioning is going,� said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer.


...Is he serious?


With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
danman5000
3.7 / 5 (3) Nov 30, 2009
It was a rough start, but now that they've finally got it working it sounds like things are moving along rapidly. It's not even at the "new physics" stage, and it's already breaking records!
Drumsk8
3.8 / 5 (4) Nov 30, 2009
Danman500

Breaking the previous record was always the intention of the machine and it's nice to see that their ramping up the intenisty at a faster pace.

However the new physics stage your talking about will have collision energys of about 5x this, so breaking the record in terms of the LHC is only a very minor achivement it will be breaking it's own record for the next few weeks and then years to come as the machine is calibrated and understood more in-depth.
Erog
4.3 / 5 (6) Nov 30, 2009
Being the largest and most complicated machine humans have ever constructed . . It is going very well. And one thing people seem to miss is that each bigger collider is a prototype and need slow carful testing (just like any other prototype from a new rocket to a new engine to a car line) And as there is only one they need to be quite carful and learn the small "got-yas" every machine has.

When will they do some "new Physics"? When they can . . Rushing is counterproductive as real Science needs to be done . . not fleeting instant gratification the current warp-speed culture is used to.
danman5000
4 / 5 (4) Nov 30, 2009
@Drumsk8: That's exactly what I was saying. The fact that it already is breaking records and isn't even anywhere near its full potential is amazing. An ambitious project for sure, and I'm very glad it was funded to completion. I am eager to see what comes of it!
Drumsk8
3 / 5 (2) Nov 30, 2009
Certainly shame about it's orginal (SSC) never made it much past the drawing board. But like all the science comunity I really can't wait to see what the new year brings! And with the promise of some new papers wanting to peer at the posisble potential of string theory being experamentaly tested. It's like a heavy mass fight who gonna win, SM or ST =)
VOICEOFTRUTH
Nov 30, 2009
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
TrustTheONE
5 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2009
Maybe they can finally open the stargate! ;)
Nodrog
4.7 / 5 (3) Dec 01, 2009
enithing, anigravity, paralelel, what does this mean?

Personally I consider CERN to be the most exciting scientific project on the planet, bar none. It's certainly not misadventure and is the best thing that could be done with tax payers money to improve our understanding of the universe.

Certainly far more effective in terms of science than building rockets to go back to the moon, now that's a real waste of money. It lacks vision.
VOICEOFTRUTH
Dec 01, 2009
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
JIMBO
not rated yet Dec 02, 2009
More poor science writing from physorg...
The LHC's beams are set in terms of energy, NOT energy per sec (power). Somebody on the staff needs a reprimand & a dictionary.
Does anyone understand why the specific value of 1.18 Tev was picked ? 1.00 Tev would have broken the Tevatron limit. Was it physics or accelerator engineering that picked that energy ?
Alexa
1 / 5 (2) Dec 03, 2009
while stopped at red light u look at a little kid playing with a toy car called CERN
I agree. In my opinion the ratio of safety and contribution on the LHC experiment is suboptimal. We cannot find Higgs boson or supersymmetry there, because both phenomena were observed already at Tevatron, as I explained previously. Even if we confirm them in independent way, we couldn't compute mass of electron or proton with higher precision, then the thirty years old Heim's theory allows. The practical usefulness of these experiments is minimal and we can wait easily for the moment, when evolution of technology would help us to carry out such experiment in free cosmic space, i.e. at safe distance from Earth. We are just facing voluntarism of science, driven by irresponsible socialistic government of European Union. There is a lotta much more important things to investigate and we should research cold fusion or room temperature superconductivity instead to avoid economical a political crisis.
Erog
5 / 5 (1) Dec 03, 2009
while stopped at red light u look at a little kid playing with a toy car called CERN
I agree. In my opinion the ratio of safety and contribution on the LHC experiment is suboptimal.

An expert on this are we?? There seems to be quite a few Uber experts ready to give there 2cents on things they have only read about (armchair brainiacs that know everything by reading the inter-toobes).
And as always give some lame political spin or conspiracy theory if possible - socialistic government interested in a strictly pure science advance and not one that would directly help "the People" or to control them? really? you may want to look up Socialism again . . it is not just a derogatory word :P
the guys who jump to mars daily and who do daily expeditions across the universe laugh there as of at cern - VOICEOFTRUTH

Time for your medicine, space fleet does not like you talking so much =:o

Wow, the wackos are out . .
johanfprins
1 / 5 (1) Dec 10, 2009
A Higging burp?

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