Russia: no space for space tourists

Nov 26, 2009
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi, left, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, center, and U.S. astronaut Timothy J. Creamer, right, are seen before the final test in a mock-up of the Zvezda and Zarya training module in Star City outside Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Nov. 26, 2009. The three are the next crew scheduled to blast off to the International Space Station on Dec. 21 from Baikonur cosmodrom. (AP Photo/Mikhail Metzel)

(AP) -- A top Russian space official says there is no space for tourists wishing to fly to the International Space Station.

Sergei Krikalyov said that since the stations crew has doubled to six people, there is no room for tourists in the Russian spacecraft that link the station with Earth.

Russia's will provide the only link to the station after the planned retirement of the U.S. shuttle fleet next year.

Canadian Cirque du Soleil founder Guy Laliberte returned to Earth last month after a stint as the seventh paying space tourist aboard the station.

Krikalyov, the chief of the Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City outside Moscow, spoke Thursday during a training session for a crew going to station in late December.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: Best evidence yet for coronal heating theory detected by NASA sounding rocket

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Circus founder calls his trip to space a success

Oct 13, 2009

(AP) -- Cirque du Soleil founder Guy Laliberte on Tuesday called his 10-day space mission "a great success" because it drew attention to his efforts to guarantee access to clean water worldwide.

Russian spacecraft with circus tycoon lands safely

Oct 11, 2009

(AP) -- The Russian Soyuz capsule carrying Cirque du Soleil founder Guy Laliberte and two other space travelers landed safely in Kazakhstan on Sunday, ending the entertainment tycoon's mirthful space odyssey.

Circus tycoon clowns around aboard space station

Oct 02, 2009

(AP) -- A Canadian circus billionaire boarded the International Space Station on Friday after a smooth ride up from Earth, and promptly played the entertainer by donning a red clown nose for a camera.

Craft carrying circus tycoon reaches space station

Oct 02, 2009

(AP) -- A Russian spacecraft docked Friday at the International Space Station to drop off Canadian circus billionaire Guy Laliberte - dubbed the first clown in space - along with an American astronaut and Russian cosmonaut.

Recommended for you

Rosetta measures comet's temperature

7 hours ago

(Phys.org) —ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has made its first temperature measurements of its target comet, finding that it is too hot to be covered in ice and must instead have a dark, dusty crust.

How Rosetta arrives at a comet

9 hours ago

After travelling nearly 6.4 billion kilometres through the Solar System, ESA's Rosetta is closing in on its target. But how does a spacecraft actually arrive at a comet?

Lunar occultation of Saturn

9 hours ago

On the night of Monday August 4, mainland Australia will see Saturn disappear behind the moon. It's the third time this year that the moon and Saturn will perfectly line up, as viewed from our part of the ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

iknow
Nov 26, 2009
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
RayCherry
1 / 5 (1) Nov 26, 2009
Perhaps a comment about a temporary resource allocation conditions that has been taken out of context and dramamtised. Everyone in the Space industry recognises the value of tourism in terms of financial sponsorship and PR.