Gene implicated in stress-induced high blood pressure

Nov 23, 2009

Do stressful situations make your blood pressure rise? If so, your phosducin gene could be to blame according to a team of researchers, at the University of Freiburg, Germany, and the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, that has identified a role for the protein generated by the phosducin gene in modulating blood pressure in response to stress in both mice and humans.

The team, led by Lutz Hein and Ulrich Broeckel, generated lacking phosducin and found that they had increased baseline when compared with normal mice and that they showed enhanced increases in blood pressure in response to post-operative stress. Analysis in humans indicated that a number of phosducin gene variants were associated with certain stress-dependent blood pressure responses. Further, one in particular was associated with elevated baseline blood pressure.

These data led the authors to suggest that phosducin might be a good target for drugs designed to alleviate stress-induced high blood pressure. In an accompanying commentary, however, Guido Grassi, at Clinica Medica, Italy, notes that further studies are needed before the therapeutic implications of these data can really be determined.

More information: Phosducin influences sympathetic activity and prevents stress-induced hypertension in humans and mice. View this article at: www.jci.org/articles/view/38433?key=ch6PLgvm06ENhpLnhy41

Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation

Explore further: Inaccurate reporting jeopardizing clinical trials

Related Stories

Elderly may have higher blood pressure in cold weather

Jan 12, 2009

Outdoor temperature and blood pressure appear to be correlated in the elderly, with higher rates of hypertension in cooler months, according to a report in the January 12 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

Genes and drugs team up to lower blood pressure

Sep 13, 2007

Patients with high blood pressure respond very differently to antihypertensive medication, making treatment selection tricky for physicians. But new research published in the online open access journal, BMC Medical Genetics, pinpoi ...

Recommended for you

Inaccurate reporting jeopardizing clinical trials

10 hours ago

The team led by Dr Sheena Cruickshank of the Faculty of Life Sciences and Professor Andy Brass from the School of Computer Science analysed 58 papers on research into inflammatory bowel disease published between 2000 and ...

Fat signals control energy levels in the brain

Apr 23, 2015

An enzyme secreted by the body's fat tissue controls energy levels in the brain, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings, in mice, underscore a role ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.