The developing child: Rating aggressive and delinquent behavior in pre-adolescence

Nov 19, 2009

In a study published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry researchers show that over reactive parenting, such as heavy criticism or yelling as a response to a child's negative behavior, can produce higher levels of aggression or rule-breaking in a child who is normally introverted, non-benevolent, non-conscientious, or imaginative. Children who are extraverted, benevolent, conscientious, or not that imaginative by nature are least adversely affected by this parental response.

The research (taken from 586 families) shows that rule-breaking and aggressive behavior is influenced by the inherent of a child. The study also shows that aggression-related behavior generally decreases as the children grow but on average the rule-breaking does not change, and both genders exhibit these behaviors between the ages six to fifteen. When examining both personality and gender boys and girls are not different affected by parenting methods.

More information: This study is published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Psychology and Psychiatry. To view the abstract for this article, please visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/122688775/abstract .

Source: Wiley (news : web)

Explore further: Treatment of substance abuse can lessen risk of future violence in mentally ill, study finds

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