The developing child: Rating aggressive and delinquent behavior in pre-adolescence

Nov 19, 2009

In a study published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry researchers show that over reactive parenting, such as heavy criticism or yelling as a response to a child's negative behavior, can produce higher levels of aggression or rule-breaking in a child who is normally introverted, non-benevolent, non-conscientious, or imaginative. Children who are extraverted, benevolent, conscientious, or not that imaginative by nature are least adversely affected by this parental response.

The research (taken from 586 families) shows that rule-breaking and aggressive behavior is influenced by the inherent of a child. The study also shows that aggression-related behavior generally decreases as the children grow but on average the rule-breaking does not change, and both genders exhibit these behaviors between the ages six to fifteen. When examining both personality and gender boys and girls are not different affected by parenting methods.

More information: This study is published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Psychology and Psychiatry. To view the abstract for this article, please visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/122688775/abstract .

Source: Wiley (news : web)

Explore further: Pre-enlistment mental disorders and suicidality among new US Army soldiers

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New research: Genes may influence popularity

Dec 22, 2008

A groundbreaking study of popularity by a Michigan State University scientist has found that genes elicit not only specific behaviors but also the social consequences of those behaviors.

Move over mean girls -- boys can be socially aggressive, too

Sep 16, 2008

Society holds that when it comes to aggression, boys hit and punch, while girls spread rumors, gossip, and intentionally exclude others, a type of aggression that's called indirect, relational, or social. Now a new analysis ...

Impact of positive parenting can last for generations

Sep 01, 2009

A new study that looks at data on three generations of Oregon families shows that "positive parenting" - including factors such as warmth, monitoring children's activities, involvement, and consistency of discipline - not ...

Study: verbal aggression may affect children's behavior

Aug 04, 2008

The methods mothers use to control their children during playtime and other daily activities could have a negative impact on their child's self-esteem and behavior, according to a new Purdue University study.

Recommended for you

Intervention program helps prevent high-school dropouts

5 hours ago

New research findings from a team of prevention scientists at Arizona State University demonstrates that a family-focused intervention program for middle-school Mexican American children leads to fewer drop-out rates and ...

Bilingualism over the lifespan

6 hours ago

It's a scene that plays out every day in Montreal. On the bus, in schools, in the office and at home, conversations weave seamlessly back and forth between French and English, or one of the many other languages represented ...

User comments : 0