Hawaii planning to replenish sand at Waikiki Beach

Nov 14, 2009 By AUDREY McAVOY , Associated Press Writer

(AP) -- Hawaii officials are appealing to the state's tourism authority for funds to restore part of world-famous Waikiki Beach.

The officials want to pump sand from a spot offshore to an area from the Royal Hawaiian Hotel to the Duke Kahanamoku statue.

The sand there has been eroding over the years. During the past year, water has been known to rush into a hotel restaurant bar fronting the beach at peak high tide.

The restoration project would cost between $2 million to $3 million. The state hopes the tourism authority will provide about $1 million.

The state has already set aside $1.5 million. It also hopes Kyo-ya Hotel and Resorts - the owner of the Royal Hawaiian, the Moana Surfrider and other Waikiki hotels - will contribute $500,000.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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