Rice sociologist looks at pediatric physicians' views on religion, spirituality

Nov 11, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Pediatricians and pediatric oncologists express differing views on religion and spirituality, largely based on the types of patients they treat, according to a survey that will appear in the current edition of the journal Social Problems.

Elaine Howard Ecklund, assistant professor of sociology and associate director of the Center on Race, and Urban Life at Rice University, is a co-author of the study, which is based on in-depth interviews with 30 doctors who practice and teach at elite medical centers around the United States. The other authors are Wendy Cadge of Brandeis University and Nicholas Short of Baylor College of Medicine.

The study focused on two questions: "How do pediatric physicians gather information about religion and spirituality in their work with patients and families and describe when, if at all, that information is relevant to their professional work? Second, as they negotiate professional boundaries around religion and spirituality in everyday interactions with patients and families, do they perceive religion and spirituality to be a barrier or a bridge to medical care?"

The research found "that pediatric oncologists are more likely than the pediatricians interviewed to see the religion or spirituality of patients as relevant to their professional jurisdictions." Moreover, "the majority of the physicians interviewed see religion and spirituality as most relevant in difficult medical decision-making situations, in particular those made about end of life care."

The researchers conclude that overall, the physicians in the survey "see religion and spirituality as both a barrier and a bridge to medical care. Physicians think it is a barrier when it impedes their work and/or care for children, especially care for children who are Jehovah’s Witnesses, Orthodox Jews, or members of religious traditions that have existed in some tension with biomedicine. It is a bridge when it helps patients and families make sense of illness, adjust to difficult news, and answer questions that medicine inherently cannot."

The survey's data were gathered through lengthy interviews with 30 randomly selected pediatric physicians (14 pediatricians and 16 pediatric oncologists) at top U.S. teaching hospitals, including Stanford Hospital and Clinics, The Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, UCLA Medical Center, the University of Michigan Medical Center, Duke University Medical Center, University of Washington Medical Center, Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic, New York-Presbyterian Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, University of California San Francisco Medical Center and Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

The study, titled "Religion and : A Barrier and a Bridge in the Everyday Professional work of Pediatric Physicians," was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholars in Health Policy Research Program and the John Templeton Foundation.

The full text can be found at caliber.ucpress.net/toc/sp/56/4 .

Provided by Rice University (news : web)

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DanielHaszard
5 / 5 (1) Nov 12, 2009
Jehovah's Witnesses & blood transfusions is contradictory,they condemn blood but then go and use 'fractions',donated by thousands of Red Cross volunteers.They use 60% of the blood volume as broken down "fractions" then go on Bible thumping rants about how dangerous and sinful blood transfusions are.

As a diversion they go and trump the advantages of bloodless surgeries and try to grab the credit for it when in fact bloodless techniques were pioneered by non-JW doctors because of the shortage of blood donors (like with all the JW's who use blood fractions but don't donate back)

They are such hypocrites!
--

Danny Haszard
frajo
1 / 5 (1) Nov 12, 2009
In (some parts of) Europe a judge will deny the right to care for their child to JW parents for 24 hours. In this time frame the JW child receives the life saving blood transfusion.
marjon
1 / 5 (2) Nov 12, 2009
In (some parts of) Europe a judge will deny the right to care for their child to JW parents for 24 hours. In this time frame the JW child receives the life saving blood transfusion.


Where does it end? Such a state can also deny the care to someone they feel will not be cost effective.
frajo
3.7 / 5 (3) Nov 12, 2009
In (some parts of) Europe a judge will deny the right to care for their child to JW parents for 24 hours. In this time frame the JW child receives the life saving blood transfusion.


Where does it end? Such a state can also deny the care to someone they feel will not be cost effective.

In this case it's not the state that's denying care. It's the parents who are denying life saving care to their child.
marjon
1 / 5 (2) Nov 12, 2009
In (some parts of) Europe a judge will deny the right to care for their child to JW parents for 24 hours. In this time frame the JW child receives the life saving blood transfusion.


Where does it end? Such a state can also deny the care to someone they feel will not be cost effective.

In this case it's not the state that's denying care. It's the parents who are denying life saving care to their child.

Why does the state care when it allows mothers to kill their babies before they are born?
But the point still remains, a state that can force care can deny care as well.
JJ2014
not rated yet Nov 16, 2009
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The following website summarizes over 500 Jehovah's Witnesses Employment related lawsuits, etc, including DOZENS of court cases in which JW Employees refused blood transfusions, and/or other cases involving Worker's Comp, medical, health, and disability issues:

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