Professor: 'Depression is like the worst disease you can get' (Video)

Nov 10, 2009

Depression must be understood on both a biological and psychological level, says Robert Sapolsky.

We've all felt a little blue, down in the dumps, or just plain sad. But when a serious sets in, it could be weeks, months or even years before the feeling lifts.

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Provided by Stanford University (news : web)

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