IVF insurance coverage yields fewer multiple births, researchers find

Oct 20, 2009

The proportion of in vitro fertilization (IVF) multiple births was lower in the eight states that provide insurance coverage for couples seeking IVF treatment, primarily due to fewer embryos transferred per cycle, Yale School of Medicine researchers report in an abstract presented at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine meeting in Atlanta, Georgia, October 17-21.

IVF remains an expensive treatment option for those with infertility, and many cannot afford it. A course of treatment averages about $9,500 dollars, not including medication. As of 2006, Arkansas, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Rhode Island mandated full insurance coverage for IVF, while another seven states provide infertility coverage, but not for IVF.

J. Ryan Martin, M.D., a researcher in Yale's Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, and Pasquale Patrizio, M.D., director of the Yale Fertility Center, studied whether insurance coverage affected the outcome in IVF. Using data submitted to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, they analyzed outcomes on women aged 35 and younger who underwent IVF. Outcomes from IVF-insurance-mandated states were compared to outcomes from states without such a mandate.

In states without for IVF, the number of live births per cycle and multiple births were significantly higher, likely due to the higher number of embryos being transferred. Patrizio said that in states without coverage for IVF, the higher rate of multiple births ultimately means higher costs for couples, insurance companies, and society at large due to the higher pregnancy rate and birth complications.

"These results suggest that when couples bear the expense of IVF, physicians might feel pressure to transfer more ," said Patrizio. "This highlights the delicate balance a physician must strike between obtaining a positive reproductive outcome and avoiding higher order multiple births."

He added, "These results should encourage insurances to provide IVF coverage because it may lower the rate of , promotes maternal fetal health and is cost-effective in the long run. The lack of IVF coverage in the majority of states also deprives many infertile couples access to effective treatment."

Source: Yale University (news : web)

Explore further: US scientists make embryonic stem cells from adult skin

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

ICSI or IVF: Babies born from frozen embryos do just as well

Jun 29, 2009

Analysis of the longest running ICSI programme in the United States has found reassuring evidence that babies born from frozen embryos fertilised via ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) do just as well as those born from ...

Single embryo implants work better: study

Mar 25, 2009

Implanting single embryos into the wombs of women seeking to boost fertility is more effective and less costly than placing two embryos at a time, a pair of studies released Wednesday found.

Recommended for you

Leeches help save woman's ear after pit bull mauling

Apr 18, 2014

(HealthDay)—A pit bull attack in July 2013 left a 19-year-old woman with her left ear ripped from her head, leaving an open wound. After preserving the ear, the surgical team started with a reconnection ...

New pain relief targets discovered

Apr 17, 2014

Scientists have identified new pain relief targets that could be used to provide relief from chemotherapy-induced pain. BBSRC-funded researchers at King's College London made the discovery when researching ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Finnish inventor rethinks design of the axe

(Phys.org) —Finnish inventor Heikki Kärnä is the man behind the Vipukirves Leveraxe, which is a precision tool for splitting firewood. He designed the tool to make the job easier and more efficient, with ...

Poll: Big Bang a big question for most Americans

Few Americans question that smoking causes cancer. But they have more skepticism than confidence in global warming, the age of the Earth and evolution and have the most trouble believing a Big Bang created the universe 13.8 ...