Sagem and Hitachi unveil multi-modal finger vein and fingerprint device

Oct 20, 2009

Sagem Sécurité and Hitachi, the engineering and information technology giant will unveil the first ever multi-modal finger vein and fingerprint device at Biometrics 2009 in London, Finger VP.

This new device combines Hitachi's Finger Vein imaging (VeinID) to detect the pattern of blood vessels under the skin, and Sagem Sécurité's fingerprint identification technology (Morpho).

It is the only multi-modal device capable of simultaneously capturing and processing two sets of biometric data and can be used either for one-to-one or one-to-many verification.

Hideyuki Ariyasu, Managing Director of Europe said: "The consolidation of our Finger Vein Authentication with Sagem's Finger Print technology has resulted in a device which gives companies and individuals unrivalled levels of security, accuracy and performance."

FINGER VP is designed to be used either standalone or integrated into a vast range of end-user devices, e.g. access control terminals, ATM, mobile devices for identity checks and secure payments. It is being geared for mass roll-out in 2010.

Source: Hitachi

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