Dyson Unveils His Bladeless Fan (w/ Videos)

Oct 14, 2009 by John Messina weblog
Dyson's Bladeless Fan
Using 'Air Multiplier' technology, air is pushed forward, dragging air from behind and from the sides.Without rotor blades, a smooth airflow is created.

(PhysOrg.com) -- James Dyson, inventor of the bag-less vacuum cleaners has taken his invention one step further with the unveiling of the bladeless fan. Using 'Air Multiplier' technology the bladeless fan pushes 119 gallons of air per second.

Unlike conventional fans that rely on blades to chop the air and push it forward, the bladeless fan technology uses an airflow principle modeled after an airplane wing.

Air is pulled into the machine's cylindrical base using a small brushless motor. The motor's impeller pushes air into a hollow ring and is then forced out a slit that runs all around the ring. The is then accelerated into the circular chamber which is called a loop . The video below illustrates the airflow technology.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

In an interview with Dyson, he said: "I've always been disappointed by fans. Their spinning blades chop up the , causing annoying buffeting. They're hard to clean and children always want to poke their fingers through the grille. So we've developed a new type of fan that doesn't use blades."

More information: For detailed information on the design and how the bladeless fan works, visit the Dyson website.

© 2009 PhysOrg.com

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Temple
Oct 14, 2009
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
RobertKLR
4 / 5 (4) Oct 14, 2009
I've seen variations of this concept on construction sites where people need a lot of ventilating airflow. The concept has been in use for maybe 80 years?
plasticpower
1.7 / 5 (3) Oct 14, 2009
Wouldn't it be more efficient, since the motor used in a bladelsss fan is smaller, and therefore uses less electricity? t might have the same airflow, but definitely more efficiency.
fossilator
4.8 / 5 (4) Oct 14, 2009
Doesn't the impeller still have blades? Seems just a fancy way to smooth the airflow.
Scryer
2 / 5 (4) Oct 14, 2009
It's pretty nice, I wonder if the concept could be reversed?
Osmosium
5 / 5 (3) Oct 14, 2009
How stupid. Besides blowing air, people want fans that are quiet. This is the loudest fan you can get.
Sean_W
2.3 / 5 (4) Oct 14, 2009
Doesn't the impeller still have blades? Seems just a fancy way to smooth the airflow.


It seems to use a pump (in the base) rather than blades. In addition to smoothing airflow, which would be useful in industrial tasks where you want to dry a substance without disrupting it, I would wager that it would make the fan quieter because the pump could be sheilded in the base whereas sheilding the central motor of a fan risks making it top heavy.
Osmosium
5 / 5 (5) Oct 14, 2009
It still uses a fan, its just hidden. Its a loud turbine sound. The dirt will just collect in a place you cannot see. This 'article' is just an ad for Dyson as it does not say anything Dyson does not, leaving out critical details that people (but not Dyson) would want disseminated.
Arkaleus
4 / 5 (4) Oct 14, 2009
This design simply moves the blades from the outside and hides them in the column. This fan is still very much a bladed fan, except it has a airfoil added to the output to concentrate it. Not worth $300.
Sean_W
1 / 5 (1) Oct 14, 2009
Doesn't the impeller still have blades? Seems just a fancy way to smooth the airflow.


It seems to use a pump (in the base) rather than blades. In addition to smoothing airflow, which would be useful in industrial tasks where you want to dry a substance without disrupting it, I would wager that it would make the fan quieter because the pump could be sheilded in the base whereas sheilding the central motor of a fan risks making it top heavy.


Sorry, my mistake - it is a "rotor" rather than a pump but it would be smaller than a full size fan blade.
Sean_W
1 / 5 (1) Oct 14, 2009
How stupid. Besides blowing air, people want fans that are quiet. This is the loudest fan you can get.


I'm surprised to hear that. Have these been on the market long? If so, why are people buying them if they are so loud and if not, where did you get to see (hear) one?
Sean_W
1 / 5 (1) Oct 14, 2009
It's pretty nice, I wonder if the concept could be reversed?


Sort of. I have seen articles about a new windmill design that uses a couple of similar wing shaped cylinders cowls to concentrate and accelorate the wind through a smaller blade.
Sean_W
2.5 / 5 (2) Oct 14, 2009
I've seen variations of this concept on construction sites where people need a lot of ventilating airflow. The concept has been in use for maybe 80 years?


Funny how good ideas often get issolated in one field until they are rediscovered in another.
jerryd
2.3 / 5 (3) Oct 14, 2009

There is no way this fan would be as anywhere near as eff as a prop fan. I could make a 6" regular fan blow it's doors off.
It will sell though as art.
poi
not rated yet Oct 14, 2009
could they modify it to fit as a graphics card fan? x15 cooling?
Truth
5 / 5 (3) Oct 14, 2009
What ever happened to that other concept that came out in the 1960's....It was two rings placed about 3 inches apart..the first ring had a positive charge, the second had a negative charge...the second pulled in air that had been "charged" and propelled it out as it passed the ring, creating an air flow. If I remember correctly, it had no noise, no moving parts whatsoever, and the air flow could be adjusted from soft to very fast. It was shown working with smiling people, just like this one, but I never heard anything more about it. Anybody have any recollection or info on it?
Graeme
4 / 5 (1) Oct 14, 2009
see http://en.wikiped...thruster and also there Ion wind and http://en.wikiped...onocraft for machines that use electric charge and ions to make an airflow
jimbo92107
5 / 5 (3) Oct 14, 2009
The personal jetpack is complete! Take two of Dyson's fans, replace the feeble impeller motor with an automobile supercharger, run a mixture of gasoline and air through the cowling, attach a small afterburner housing, put two of these side-by-side on a sturdy titanium frame, and viola! A loud, fiery death video, perfect for Youtube!
Bob_Kob
5 / 5 (2) Oct 15, 2009
How stupid. Besides blowing air, people want fans that are quiet. This is the loudest fan you can get.


Really? I thought this was alright since it was a rotorless and apparently silent fan. But if it still makes noise then its completely useless.
Pointedly
Oct 15, 2009
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Nilesh
2 / 5 (2) Oct 15, 2009
it works on ventury principle.
but the final power required for propelling air needs to be given by fan in base. it will require small but powerful fan.(which may create noise)
cleaning of dust caugth inside air chamber will be biggest difficulty.
also water in air may condence near vents as it happens on airplane wings

still-it is a technological advancement
hope to see cheaper versions hit the market soon.
fixer
2 / 5 (2) Oct 15, 2009
Technology to silence noise is available.
given that and the fact you have no dangerous voltages or fan blades for little fingers to touch I think this has excellent commercial viability.
Paradox
not rated yet Oct 15, 2009
How stupid. Besides blowing air, people want fans that are quiet. This is the loudest fan you can get.


Really? it did not sound any louder than any other fan I have seen.
sender
5 / 5 (1) Oct 15, 2009
Couple this tech with turboshafts, refridgeration units, some plasma turbines and we'll have good magnetoaerodynamic engines to power everything from vehicles to industrial factories, best of all with nexto zero emissions.
Andrux
4 / 5 (2) Oct 18, 2009
to Truth---- Thomas Townsend Brown invented a real bladeless fans in the early 1960's if i recall. he also invented a bunch of different invention working with high voltage technology. An interesting man worth lookinng into his work.
Truth
not rated yet Oct 29, 2009
Thanks, Graeme, I checked out the article you suggested. I was amazed to discover that the ionic air flow concept dated all the way back to 1709...! That article sure was an eye-opener. I wonder if these "cutting-edge" Dyson techs know about it...
Truth
not rated yet Oct 29, 2009
And thanks to you, Andrux! I'll check Brown and his research out too. This seems to be a very interesting line of research!
Martin_Hunt
not rated yet Dec 10, 2009
The personal jetpack is complete! Take two of Dyson's fans, replace the feeble impeller motor with an automobile supercharger, run a mixture of gasoline and air through the cowling, attach a small afterburner housing, put two of these side-by-side on a sturdy titanium frame, and viola! A loud, fiery death video, perfect for Youtube!


BRILLIANT!

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