Researchers find demand for cosmetic and surgical procedures in dermatologic surgery rising rapidly

Oct 05, 2009

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and the Laser and Skin Cancer Center of Indiana, (Carmel, Indiana), found that there has been a dramatic increase in the number of procedures performed and patient demand for dermatologic health care since 2000. The findings, which were recently reported in Dermatologic Surgery, parallels the growth in the age of individuals between the ages of 40 to 55, who make up the "Baby Boomer" generation.

The number of cosmetic and non-cosmetic surgical procedures performed by dermatologic surgeons has been rising rapidly, but there are few consistent data sources that track procedure volumes over time. Accurate reporting is critical to assess adequacy of current training for residents and fellows to meet patient demand. In addition, reporting is critical for making future workforce projection models of the need for additional dermatologic surgeons and to anticipate the proportion of demand in cosmetic and non-cosmetic dermatologic surgery.

Using data from the 2001 to 2007 American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) member survey, the researchers found that dermatologic surgeons performed an estimated 3.4 million cosmetic and non-cosmetic surgical procedures; in 2007, it was estimated that a total of 7.6 million procedures were performed (120 percent rate of growth between 2001 and 2007). The procedures with the greatest increase during this time period were soft tissue augmentation (405 percent increase), botulinum toxin injections (324 percent increase), and non-ablative skin rejuvenation (laser, light, and radiofrequency sources) (330 percent increase). More modest increases were noted in procedures (85 percent increase) and ablative resurfacing procedures (66 percent increase).

According to the researchers, there are two important trends fueling the growth in the number of surgical procedures performed by dermatologic surgeons. "They include the overall advancements in procedural facets of dermatology as a specialty during the last decade combined with the increased societal emphasis on skin cancer prevention and early diagnosis, as well as a desire to prevent and reverse the skin signs of aging," said lead author Emily Tierney, MD, an assistant professor of dermatology at BUSM.

Tierney further explains, "Dermatologists have been integral to the rapid evolution of photomedicine, with the advances in laser and light devices to treat a diversity of skin conditions. These include actinic keratoses to nonmelanoma skin cancer, pigmentary and vascular disorders, hair and tattoo removal, wrinkles and other signs of photoaging. In addition, the popularity and growth in minimally invasive cosmetic procedures, including botulinum toxin injections, dermal fillers, and nonablative skin rejuvenation techniques (chemical peels and laser, light, and radiofrequency devices) have increased exponentially."

The researchers anticipate that the role for the dermatologist in a diversity of surgical
pursuits, ranging from skin cancer treatment, minimally invasive cosmetic, and laser procedures to complex cosmetic and reconstructive procedures, will continue to grow and expand and contribute to the quality and diversity of procedures performed.

Source: Boston University Medical Center

Explore further: New technology that is revealing the science of chewing

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Less common procedures less common than thought

Jul 29, 2009

The American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery announces the results of its 2009 Less Common Cosmetic Procedures consumer survey. While the media has coined these cosmetic procedures as 'fringe' and made it seem that they are ...

Significant changes in plastic surgery expected in 2008

Dec 18, 2007

Disappointed with results from the last few years’ much ballyhooed “lunch hour” and “weekend” cosmetic surgery procedures, people interested in facial rejuvenation are expected to pursue more reliably effective ...

Recommended for you

Obese British man in court fight for surgery

Jul 11, 2011

A British man weighing 22 stone (139 kilograms, 306 pounds) launched a court appeal Monday against a decision to refuse him state-funded obesity surgery because he is not fat enough.

2008 crisis spurred rise in suicides in Europe

Jul 08, 2011

The financial crisis that began to hit Europe in mid-2008 reversed a steady, years-long fall in suicides among people of working age, according to a letter published on Friday by The Lancet.

New food labels dished up to keep Europe healthy

Jul 06, 2011

A groundbreaking deal on compulsory new food labels Wednesday is set to give Europeans clear information on the nutritional and energy content of products, as well as country of origin.

Overweight men have poorer sperm count

Jul 04, 2011

Overweight or obese men, like their female counterparts, have a lower chance of becoming a parent, according to a comparison of sperm quality presented at a European fertility meeting Monday.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Low Vitamin D may not be a culprit in menopause symptoms

A new study from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) shows no significant connection between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms. The study was published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopa ...

Tech giants look to skies to spread Internet

The shortest path to the Internet for some remote corners of the world may be through the skies. That is the message from US tech giants seeking to spread the online gospel to hard-to-reach regions.

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Wireless industry makes anti-theft commitment

A trade group for wireless providers said Tuesday that the biggest mobile device manufacturers and carriers will soon put anti-theft tools on the gadgets to try to deter rampant smartphone theft.