9 in 10 high schoolers short on fruits, veggies

Sep 29, 2009 By MIKE STOBBE , AP Medical Writer

(AP) -- Health officials say only 13 percent of U.S. high school students get at least three servings of vegetables a day and just 32 percent get two servings of fruit.

Together, less than 10 percent of high schoolers were eating the combined recommended daily minimum of fruits and .

Some states - including Arkansas and - were significantly below that average. But some New England states, including Vermont, were notably better.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the report Tuesday, calling it the first to give such detailed information on adolescents' and vegetable consumption.

The information comes from a national survey of about 100,000 high school students in 2007.

---

On the Net:

CDC report: http://www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov/indicatorreport

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: Warning: Birthdays can be bad for your health

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

CDC: 1 in 3 teen girls got cervical cancer vaccine

Sep 17, 2009

(AP) -- A new government report shows one in three teenage girls have rolled up their sleeves for a relatively new vaccine against cervical cancer, but vaccination rates vary dramatically between states.

CDC, states: US swine flu cases jump to 68

Apr 28, 2009

(AP) -- The number of confirmed swine flu cases in the United States has jumped to 64, federal officials said Tuesday, and states reported at least four more.

Recommended for you

Warning: Birthdays can be bad for your health

22 minutes ago

New research has found that birthday-related drinking is associated with upsurges in hospital admissions among young people. This study of drinking behaviour in Ontario, Canada is published online today in the scientific ...

Australia's ageing population poses budget risks

59 minutes ago

Australia's public and private economy-wide deficit could blow out to more than $400 billion by 2050 due to the nation's ageing population, a new Australian National University report has found.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

docknowledge
not rated yet Sep 30, 2009
Ah. Read the CDC report. I was wondering this study was in aid of. The CDC's goals are "improved F&V consumption and thus improved nutrition among all Americans" and their strategies are "increased F&V access, availability, and reduced price are key strategies".

So, the argument is "supply and demand".

Well, I don't think that was ever my main reason for not eating enough fruits and vegetables. We had them on the table every meal as a boy. The problem was that my parents were terrible cooks. A fair amount of what we had came out of cans (and not the most expensive brands). My mother and father were both fond of high-fat diets (they exercised), so a couple cans of blanched peas in brine, heated and smothered with mayonnaise were popular. (The only spices on the table were salt and pepper.) Trouble is, as a child, I never got used to selecting, buying, cooking and tasting good vegetables. Cost, for me was not an issue. It was my parent's eating and cooking habits.