Does Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy prevent gastric cancer?

Sep 25, 2009

Although it has been demonstrated that Helicobacter pylori causes gastric cancer, it is still controversial that whether H. pylori eradication therapy is effective in primary prevention of gastric cancer. This is especially important for Yamagata Prefecture, a region of Japan with the second highest incidence of gastric cancer in the world.

A research article to be published on September 14, 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. A research team led by Dr. Katsuhiro Mabe from Division of Gastroenterology of KKR Sapporo Medical Center did a multicenter, prospective cohort study in residents of Yamagata Prefecture between 2000 and 2007. They compared the incidence of between patients with H. pylori-positive peptic ulcer who underwent H. pylori eradication (eradication group) or conventional antacid therapy (non-eradication group) at the patients’ discretion.

A total of 4133 patients with a mean age of 52.9 years were registered, and 56 cases of gastric cancer were found over a mean follow-up period of 5.6 years. The sex- and age-adjusted incidence ratio of gastric cancer in the eradication group, as compared with the non-eradication group, was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.28-1.19). The ratios by follow-up period of < 1 year, 1-3 years, and > 3 years were 1.16 (0.27-5.00), 0.50 (0.17-1.49), and 0.34 (0.09-1.28), respectively, which indicated that longer follow-up tended to be associated with better prevention of gastric cancer.

There was no significant difference in incidence of gastric cancer between patients with and without successful eradication therapy. However, among patients with duodenal ulcer, which is more common in younger individuals, the incidence of cancer was significantly less in those with successful eradication.

The results of the study, which revealed no overall prevention of gastric cancer by eradication therapy for peptic ulcer during observation highlight the importance of longer and careful follow-up after eradication therapy. Furthermore, the significant efficacy of treatment observed in younger patients suggests the need to eradicate H. pylori as early as possible.

More information: Mabe K, Takahashi M, Oizumi H, Tsukuma H, Shibata A, Fukase K, Matsuda T, Takeda H, Kawata S. Does eradication therapy for peptic ulcer prevent gastric cancer? World J Gastroenterol 2009; 15(34): 4290-4297.

Source: (news : web)

Explore further: Team identifies source of most cases of invasive bladder cancer

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Early treatment of stomach infection may prevent cancer

May 01, 2008

Based on research using a new mouse model of gastritis and stomach cancer, researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) say that prompt treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections reverses ...

What is the risk factor for gastric cancer in a Costa Rican?

Jan 21, 2009

A research group from Costa Rican evaluated risk factors for gastric cancer in Costa Rican regions with contrasting gastric cancer incidence rates (GCIR). They found that although a pro-inflammatory cytokine genetic profile ...

New findings may help prevent stomach cancer

May 01, 2008

Prompt treatment of a microbe that causes stomach ulcers and other ailments can reverse damage to the lining of the stomach and ultimately prevent one of the most lethal forms of cancer from developing there, MIT researchers ...

Recommended for you

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

11 hours ago

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Unraveling the 'black ribbon' around lung cancer

Apr 17, 2014

It's not uncommon these days to find a colored ribbon representing a disease. A pink ribbon is well known to signify breast cancer. But what color ribbon does one think of with lung cancer?

User comments : 0

More news stories

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.