Li-Air: Argonne opens new chapter in battery research (w/ Video)

Sep 23, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Argonne National Laboratory has engaged in battery research and development for more than 40 years. More than 10 years ago the research facility made a strategic decision to expand its research of Lithium-ion batteries, with a particular focus on developing applications for electric cars.

That decision, and subsequent investments for research by the U.S. Department of Energy, have yielded technology transfer agreements, 149 inventions, more than 40 patents and four R&D 100 Awards.

In a natural progression, Argonne is now pursuing research into Lithium-air batteries. Li-air batteries use a catalytic air cathode that converts oxygen to lithium peroxide, an electrolyte and a Li anode.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

Ensuring safe operation of the battery is one of the major challenges involves developing materials that will ensure reliability and safety. While the potential of Li-air batteries is great, the research to get there will take time and close working relationships with industry, who will eventually adopt the technology for commercial application. Watch Michael Thackeray, Distinguished Argonne Fellow, discuss this adaptation.

Provided by Argonne National Laboratory (news : web)

Explore further: Converting olive mash into cash

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Two Robot Chefs Make Omelets

Dec 04, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- No "house of the future" is complete without a household robot to do the cooking and cleaning. Although today´s robots still have a ways to go before substituting for a real live-in maid, ...

Recommended for you

Converting olive mash into cash

1 hour ago

An experimental system to create heat and power with waste from olive oil processing is up-and-running in Spain. Carina Lagergren, a researcher from Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology, says the system ...

New step towards future production of solar fuels

2 hours ago

One way of storing solar energy is to transform the energy directly into a fuel. Researchers at Uppsala University have shown a reaction which makes the process of creating fuel from solar energy more efficient ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Sonhouse
not rated yet Nov 03, 2009
Not very informative as to what the technology is all about, just those dudes saying News at 11.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.