Can an over-the-counter vitamin-like substance slow the progression of Parkinson's disease?

Sep 21, 2009

Rush University Medical Center is participating in a large-scale, multi-center clinical trial in the U.S. and Canada to determine whether a vitamin-like substance, in high doses, can slow the progression of Parkinson's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder that affects about one million people in the United States.

"At present, the very best therapies we have for Parkinson's can only mask the symptoms - they do not alter the underlying disease," said neurologist Dr. Katie Kompoliti, a specialist in movement disorders. "Finding a treatment that can slow the degenerative course of Parkinsons's is the holy grail of Parkinson's research."

The substance being tested, called coenzyme Q10, is produced naturally in the body and is an important link in the chain of that produce energy in mitochondria, the "powerhouses" of cells. The enzyme is also a potent antioxidant - a chemical that "mops up" potentially harmful chemicals generated during normal metabolism.

Several studies have shown that Parkinson's patients have impaired mitochondrial function and low levels of coenzyme Q10. Moreover, laboratory research has demonstrated that coenzyme Q10 can protect the area of the brain damaged in Parkinson's.

The Phase III clinical trial, a large, randomized study with a control group, follows an earlier investigation that tested several doses of coenzyme Q10 in a small group of patients with early-stage . The highest dose, 1,200 mg, appeared promising. Over the course of 16 months, patients taking this dose experienced significantly less decline than other patients in motor (movement) function and ability to carry out activities of daily living, such as feeding or dressing themselves.

But researchers involved in the study, including Kompoliti, were cautious about their findings, citing the need for a more extensive review to confirm the results.

In the present trial, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Neurological and Disorders and Stroke, 600 patients will be enrolled at 60 centers in the U.S. and Canada. Two dosages of coenzyme Q10 are being tested,1,200 mg and 2,400 mg, delivered in maple nut-flavored chewable wafers that also contain vitamin E.

Participants in the study will be evaluated periodically over 16 months for symptoms of Parkinson's disease, including tremor, stiffness of the limbs and trunk, impaired balance and coordination, and slowing of movements. They will also be assessed for ability to perform daily activities, overall quality of life, and need to take medications to alleviate symptoms.

Source: Rush University Medical Center (news : web)

Explore further: Memory in silent neurons

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Creatine Parkinson trial begins

Mar 26, 2007

A large-scale national clinical trial has started to learn if the nutritional supplement creatine can slow the progression of Parkinson's disease.

Researchers discover link between Parkinson's and narcolepsy

May 11, 2007

Parkinson's disease is well-known for its progression of motor disorders: stiffness, slowness, tremors, difficulties walking and talking. Less well known is that Parkinson's shares other symptoms with narcolepsy, a sleep ...

Recommended for you

Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations

8 hours ago

Neurons in human skin perform advanced calculations, previously believed that only the brain could perform. This is according to a study from Umeå University in Sweden published in the journal Nature Ne ...

Memory in silent neurons

Aug 31, 2014

When we learn, we associate a sensory experience either with other stimuli or with a certain type of behavior. The neurons in the cerebral cortex that transmit the information modify the synaptic connections ...

Why your favourite song takes you down memory lane

Aug 28, 2014

Music triggers different functions of the brain, which helps explain why listening to a song you like might be enjoyable but a favourite song may plunge you into nostalgia, scientists said on Thursday.

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

deatopmg
not rated yet Sep 22, 2009
"....delivered in maple nut-flavored chewable wafers that also contain vitamin E." Which of the 8 vitamin E's?
otto1923
not rated yet Sep 22, 2009
Also, statins such as lipitor supposedly deplete the body of this essential substance. Many people taking these cholesterol drugs might not know this. A gram or more sounds like a lot, and expensive-
satyricon
not rated yet Oct 30, 2009
Co Q10 is an expensive supplement. In Japan, those who take lipitor are automatically given co Q10 too.