Radiologists and engineers develop a modified catheter to reduce contrast material injuries

Sep 21, 2009

Though rare, IV contrast material administration can sometimes result in patient injury. However researchers have developed a modified catheter that may prevent such events from occurring, according to a study in the October issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).

The force of the contrast material exiting the end hole of a standard catheter is what is believed to be one of the main causes of patient injury. For this study, performed at Duke University Medical Center, modified catheters with side holes and slits were developed. An was used to compare the fluid flow from a modified catheter and a standard catheter.

"We found a less pronounced amount of contrast material exited the end holes of the modified catheter as compared with the standard end-hole-only catheter," said Rendon C. Nelson, MD, senior author of the study. "Numeric calculations showed that the addition of side holes or slits resulted in a nine to 30 percent reduction of the velocity of contrast material exiting the end hole of the catheter. And we saw more of a cloud like dispersal rather than a jet," said Dr. Nelson.

"The rate at which these injuries occur varies from practice to practice. We typically have 14-15 patients per month who suffer from them. Normally the injuries we see are mild, including pain and swelling at the injection site, however they can be more severe," he said.

"As our study suggests, the development of a modified catheter that decreases the jet like phenomenon seen with a standard-end-hole could improve patient safety and decrease the likelihood of injury," said Dr. Nelson.

Source: American Roentgen Ray Society

Explore further: Experts denounce clinical trials of unscientific, 'alternative' medicines

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Inserting Catheters Without X-rays

Mar 09, 2009

X-rays penetrate the patient's body, helping the doctor guide the catheter through the artery. In future, it will be possible to monitor the position of the catheter without exposing the patient to X-ray radiation, ...

Breast cancer treatment procedure gives women more options

Nov 29, 2006

A new minimally invasive approach to partial breast irradiation provides another treatment option for women with breast cancer. The researchers presented their findings today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society ...

Catheter chaos: Hospitals lag in preventing common infection

Jan 03, 2008

[B]No consistent strategy for dealing with urinary catheters, or ensuring their removal, means patients and families need to speak up[/B] One in four Americans in the hospital right now has a urinary catheter. One percent of ...

Recommended for you

Obese British man in court fight for surgery

Jul 11, 2011

A British man weighing 22 stone (139 kilograms, 306 pounds) launched a court appeal Monday against a decision to refuse him state-funded obesity surgery because he is not fat enough.

2008 crisis spurred rise in suicides in Europe

Jul 08, 2011

The financial crisis that began to hit Europe in mid-2008 reversed a steady, years-long fall in suicides among people of working age, according to a letter published on Friday by The Lancet.

New food labels dished up to keep Europe healthy

Jul 06, 2011

A groundbreaking deal on compulsory new food labels Wednesday is set to give Europeans clear information on the nutritional and energy content of products, as well as country of origin.

Overweight men have poorer sperm count

Jul 04, 2011

Overweight or obese men, like their female counterparts, have a lower chance of becoming a parent, according to a comparison of sperm quality presented at a European fertility meeting Monday.

User comments : 0