Surviving sepsis program -- increased compliance gets results

Sep 03, 2009

A 'surviving sepsis' in-hospital project has been shown to improve the care of patients with sepsis. The educational program for early management of patients with septic shock, described in BioMed Central's open access journal Critical Care, increased compliance with sepsis guidelines and led to a 45% risk reduction for in-hospital death.

Massimo Girardis led a team of researchers from the University Hospital of Modena who carried out the study. He said, "The application of evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with severe sepsis/septic shock is still unsatisfactory. We've shown that, coupled with increased education, the institution of a specific sepsis team seems to be a key point for providing the adequate management of in-hospital patients".

The researchers tested the effects of an educational program on sepsis for physicians and nurses of all hospital departments and implementation of a specific protocol for recognition and management of patients with severe sepsis/septic shock including an early consultation by a skilled 'sepsis team'. They found that compliance with guidelines was significantly increased and that there was an improvement in outcome in intensive care unit patients. The authors report that this is the first time such an improvement has been demonstrated in this setting.

More information: Effects on management and outcome of severe sepsis and patients admitted to the after implementation of a program: a pilot study, Massimo Girardis, Laura Rinaldi, Lara Donno, Marco Marietta, Mauro Codeluppi, Patrizia Marchegiano, Claudia Venturelli and Soppravvivere alla Sepsi Group Modena University Hospital, Critical Care (in press), http://ccforum.com/

Source: BioMed Central (news : web)

Explore further: Strategies can help docs lower their tax burden

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Surprising interactions of diabetes mellitus and sepsis

Feb 13, 2009

Diabetic patients are less likely to suffer from acute respiratory failure during severe sepsis. Researchers writing in BioMed Central's open access journal Critical Care studied 930 million hospitalisations over a 25-yea ...

New study aims to stop sepsis in its tracks

Oct 02, 2006

If you've had a heart attack or stroke, paramedics, doctors, and nurses follow standardized protocols for what to do right away, and their efforts improve your odds for a full recovery. That's not the case if you have a body-wide ...

Recommended for you

The human race evolved to be fair for selfish reasons

Sep 19, 2014

"Make sure you play fairly," often say parents to their kids. In fact, children do not need encouragement to be fair, it is a unique feature of human social life, which emerges in childhood. When given the o ...

Non-stop PET/CT scan provides accurate images

Sep 18, 2014

Siemens is improving PET/CT imaging and data quality while reducing radiation exposure. The Biograph mCT Flow PET/CT scanner is a new positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) system that, ...

Experts: Chopin's heart shows signs of TB

Sep 17, 2014

The preserved heart of composer Frederic Chopin contains signs of tuberculosis and possibly some other lung disease, medical experts said Wednesday.

User comments : 0