H1N1 pandemic virus does not mutate into 'superbug' in new lab study

Sep 01, 2009
This is virologist Daniel Perez in his University of Maryland lab. Credit: University of Maryland

(PhysOrg.com) -- A laboratory study by University of Maryland researchers suggests that some of the worst fears about a virulent H1N1 pandemic flu season may not be realized this year, but does demonstrate the heightened communicability of the virus.

Using ferrets exposed to three different viruses, the Maryland researchers found no evidence that the H1N1 pandemic variety, responsible for the so-called , combines in a lab setting with other flu strains to form a more virulent 'superbug.' Rather, the pandemic virus prevailed and out-competed the other strains, reproducing in the ferrets, on average, twice as much.

The researchers believe their study is the first to examine how the pandemic virus interacts with other flu viruses. The findings are newly published in an online scientific journal designed to fast-track science research and quickly share results with other investigators, PLOS Currents.

"The H1N1 pandemic virus has a clear biological advantage over the two main seasonal flu strains and all the makings of a virus fully adapted to humans," says virologist Daniel Perez, the lead researcher and program director of the University of Maryland-based Prevention and Control of Avian Influenza Coordinated Agricultural Project.

"I'm not surprised to find that the pandemic virus is more infectious, simply because it's new, so hosts haven't had a chance to build immunity yet. Meanwhile, the older strains encounter resistance from hosts' immunity to them," Perez adds.

Some of the animals who were infected with both the new virus and one of the more familiar seasonal viruses (H3N2) developed not only , but intestinal illness as well. Perez and his team call for additional research to see whether this kind of co-infection and multiple symptoms may account for some of the deaths attributed to the new virus.

Among other research findings, the pandemic virus successfully established infections deeper in the ferret's , including the lungs. The H1 and H3 seasonal viruses remained in the nasal passages.

"Our findings underscore the need for vaccinating against the virus this season," Perez concludes. "The findings of this study are preliminary, but the far greater communicability of the pandemic virus is a clearly blinking warning light."

Perez and his team used samples of the H1N1 pandemic variety from last April's initial outbreak of the so-called swine .

Source: University of Maryland (news : web)

Explore further: Sierra Leone Ebola burial teams dump bodies in street

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Bird flu vaccine protects people and pets

Oct 20, 2008

A single vaccine could be used to protect chickens, cats and humans against deadly flu pandemics, according to an article published in the November issue of the Journal of General Virology. The vaccine protects birds and ma ...

When flu viruses 'shift and drift', how many vaccines?

Aug 29, 2009

The World Health Organisation's announcement Friday that the 2009 H1N1 virus has become the dominant strain of flu worldwide fits a historical pattern, but the impact on vaccine policy remains unclear, a top expert said. ...

Recommended for you

EU calls for 5,000 doctors to fight Ebola

4 minutes ago

The European Commission called Wednesday for 5,000 doctors to be sent from EU states to combat west Africa's Ebola epidemic, a European source with knowledge of the matter said on Wednesday.

Guinea, hit by Ebola, reports only one cholera case

12 minutes ago

The health workers rode on canoes and rickety boats to deliver cholera vaccines to remote islands in Guinea. Months later, the country has recorded only one confirmed cholera case this year, down from thousands.

Sierra Leone official: Ebola worst could be over

13 minutes ago

The Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, which has been surging in recent days, may have reached its peak and be on the verge of slowing down, Sierra Leone's information minister said Wednesday.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Sean_W
3.7 / 5 (3) Sep 01, 2009
Unless they had a couple thousand ferrets in their lab I should have been very surprised if a "super" anything arose - except maybe a super stink. The thing about chance events is that they only happen (wait for it...) by chance.
Jaclyn
not rated yet Oct 08, 2009
How does the H1N1 virus reproduce?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.