NASA fueling space shuttle for 2nd launch attempt

Aug 25, 2009 By MARCIA DUNN , AP Aerospace Writer
Space Shuttle Discovery is seen on pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Fla. Tuesday Aug. 25, 2009. Discovery and a crew of seven are scheduled to lift off Wednesday morning on a mission to deliver supplies and equipment to the International Space Station. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

(AP) -- NASA is fueling space shuttle Discovery again for an early morning launch.

Thunderstorms prevented Discovery from blasting off early Tuesday. Better weather is expected for Wednesday's 1:10 a.m. try.

Forecasters put the odds of acceptable conditions at 70 percent. The sky was fairly clear as the launch team began pumping fuel Tuesday afternoon.

Discovery is bound for the . It will haul up thousands of pounds of supplies, including six mice for a bone experiment and a treadmill named for Comedy Central's .

NASA has until the end of August to launch Discovery and its seven astronauts. Otherwise, the mission will slide into October because other countries are scheduled to launch their spacecraft.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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