IU national survey finds majority of Americans believe 'myths' about health care reform

Aug 24, 2009

Do Americans believe controversial assertions about health care reform including death panels, threats to Medicare, abortions, illegal immigrants, and other claims which the White House have labeled as untrue "myths?"

Findings from a national survey of Americans by researchers from Indiana University Center for Health Policy and Professionalism Research (CHPPR) and the Indiana University Center for Bioethics says that Americans do believe the "myths" about reform, confirming that the White House may indeed be losing this battle.

"A surprisingly large proportion of Americans believe what the White House has dubbed 'myths' about health care reform," said CHPPR director Aaron Carroll, M.D., M.S. "Ironically, we found that the least believed myths, such as those related to mandatory end-of-life decisions and euthanasia counseling, are those that have gained the most traction in the media and have resulted in changes to the House bill."

From Aug. 14 -18, a random sample of 600 Americans in the 48 contiguous states and the District of Columbia were asked 19 questions about their concerning assertions. A majority believed most of these statements to be true, with an overwhelming number of Republicans and -- for many issues -- Independents finding truth in the controversial assertions.

Who and what types of services will be covered if the proposed reforms are passed:
67 percent of Americans believe that wait times for health care services (such as surgery) will increase (91 percent of Republicans, 37 percent of Democrats, 72 percent of Independents).

Roughly 6 out of 10 Americans believe that taxpayers will be required to pay for abortions (78 percent of Republicans, 30 percent of Democrats, 58 percent of Independents)
46 percent believe that reforms will result in health care coverage for all illegal immigrants (66 percent of Republicans, 29 percent of Democrats, 43 percent of Independents).

Level of government involvement with health care if the proposed reforms pass:
5 out 10 believe the federal government will become directly involved in making personal health care decisions (80 percent of Republicans, 25 percent of Democrats, 56 percent of Independents)

However only 3 out of 10 Americans believe that the government will require the elderly to make decisions about how and when they will die (53 percent of Republicans, 14 percent of Democrats, 31 percent of Independents) - a topic that has received a considerable amount of media attention.

Impact on current health if the proposed reforms are passed:
Interestingly, fewer people surveyed believe statements regarding the impact of proposed reforms on current health insurance coverage.

Only 29 percent of respondents believe that private insurance coverage would be eliminated (44 percent of Republicans, 11 percent of Democrats, 33 percent of Independents) and only 33 percent believed that reforms would result in the elimination of employer-sponsored health insurance coverage (56 percent of Republicans, 14 percent of Democrats, 31 percent of Independents).

Additionally, only 36 percent of Americans believes that a public insurance option will put private insurance companies out of business (56 percent of Republicans, 18 percent of Democrats, 35 percent of Independents).

Costs of the proposed reforms and how the reforms will be paid for:

Almost 6 out of 10 Americans believe that a public insurance option as proposed would be too expensive for the United States to afford (84 percent of Republicans, 27 percent of Democrats, 58 percent of Independents).

51 percent believe that the public insurance option will increase health care costs (79 percent of Republicans, 21 percent of Democrats, 53 percent of Independents), and 54 percent believe that the public option will increase premiums for Americans with private health insurance (78 percent of Republicans, 28 percent of Democrats, 58 percent of Independents).

5 out of 10 Americans think that cuts will be made to Medicare in order to cover more Americans (66 percent of Republicans, 37 percent of Democrats, 44 percent of Independents).

"It's perhaps not surprising that more Republicans believe these things than Democrats," said Dr. Carroll. "What is surprising is just how many Republicans - and Independents - believe them. If the White House hopes to convince the majority of Americans that they are misinformed about health care reform, there is much work to be done."

A full report on the survey can be found at: chppr.iupui.edu/research/healthreformmyths.html

Source: Indiana University (news : web)

Explore further: Study reveals state of crisis in Canadian foster care system

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Americans don't expect healthcare reform

Mar 07, 2006

A Wall Street Journal-Harris Interactive healthcare poll suggests most Americans don't trust the Bush administration to reform the U.S. healthcare system.

Recommended for you

Study reveals state of crisis in Canadian foster care system

8 hours ago

A new study of foster care in Canada led by a researcher at Western University reveals a shrinking number of foster care providers are available across the country to care for a growing number of children with increasingly ...

Researchers prove the benefits of persimmons for diet

9 hours ago

Alba Mir and Ana Domingo, researchers from the Department of Analytical Chemistry of the University of Valencia, under the supervision of professors Miguel de la Guardia and Maria Luisa Cervera, from the same department, ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

SDMike
not rated yet Aug 25, 2009
Publishing propaganda for the US presidency has no place on physorg. The above article is filled with falsehoods or misunderstandings. Publishing this so called "research" is an insult to real scientists and readers of this website.

Can the proselytizing and get back to science!
VOR
not rated yet Aug 25, 2009
"Publishing propaganda for the US presidency has no place on physorg" Is that what you call it? 'Social' is not a dirty word. The dirty words are ignorance, greed, selfishness, gullability, and a anti-utilitarian attitude in general. Calling out the fact that ACTUAL CONSERVATIVE PROPAGANDY is working is hardly an act of propaganda itself. Its just a depressing fact of life in the US. Pigs indeed.