Ultrathin light-emitting diodes create new classes of lighting and display systems

Aug 20, 2009 by James E. Kloeppel
Photo by D. Stevenson and C. Conway, Beckman Institute, University of Illinois

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new process for creating ultrathin, ultrasmall inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and assembling them into large arrays offers new classes of lighting and display systems with interesting properties, such as see-through construction and mechanical flexibility, that would be impossible to achieve with existing technologies.

Applications for the arrays, which can be printed onto flat or flexible substrates ranging from glass to plastic and rubber, include general illumination, high-resolution home theater displays, wearable health monitors, and biomedical imaging devices.

"Our goal is to marry some of the advantages of inorganic technology with the scalability, ease of processing and resolution of organic LEDs," said John Rogers, the

Flory-Founder Chair Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Illinois.

Rogers and collaborators at the U. of I., Northwestern University, the Institute of High Performance Computing in Singapore, and Tsinghua University in Beijing describe their work in the Aug. 21 issue of the journal Science.

Compared to organic LEDs, inorganic LEDs are brighter, more robust and longer-lived. Organic LEDs, however, are attractive because they can be formed on flexible substrates, in dense, interconnected arrays. The researchers' new technology combines features of both.

"By printing large arrays of ultrathin, ultrasmall inorganic LEDs and interconnecting them using thin-film processing, we can create general lighting and high-resolution display systems that otherwise could not be built with the conventional ways that inorganic LEDs are made, manipulated and assembled," Rogers said.

To overcome requirements on device size and thickness associated with conventional wafer dicing, packaging and wire bonding methods, the researchers developed epitaxial growth techniques for creating LEDs with sizes up to 100 times smaller than usual. They also developed printing processes for assembling these devices into arrays on stiff, flexible and stretchable substrates.

As part of the growth process, a sacrificial layer of material is embedded beneath the LEDs. When fabrication is complete, a wet chemical etchent removes this layer, leaving the LEDs undercut from the wafer, but still tethered at anchor points.

To create an array, a rubber stamp contacts the wafer surface at selected points, lifts off the LEDs at those points, and transfers them to the desired substrate.

"The stamping process provides a much faster alternative to the standard robotic 'pick and place' process that manipulates inorganic LEDs one at a time," Rogers said. "The new approach can lift large numbers of small, thin LEDs from the wafer in one step, and then print them onto a substrate in another step."

By shifting position and repeating the stamping process, LEDs can be transferred to other locations on the same substrate. In this fashion, large panels and displays can be crafted from small LEDs made in dense arrays on a single, comparatively small wafer. And, because the LEDs can be placed far apart and still provide sufficient light output, the panels and displays can be nearly transparent. The thin device geometries allow the use of thin-film processing methods, rather than wire bonding, for interconnects.

In addition to solid-state lighting, instrument panels and display systems, flexible and even stretchable sheets of printed LEDs can be achieved, with potential use in the health-care industry.

"Wrapping a stretchable sheet of tiny LEDs around the human body offers interesting opportunities in biomedicine and biotechnology," Rogers said, "including applications in health monitoring, diagnostics and imaging."

Source: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (news : web)

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User comments : 3

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cyclic250
not rated yet Aug 20, 2009
I imagine next they will be interleaving the LEDs with small CMOS sensors to create a display/image capture fabric. this may lead to the emergence of a cloak of invisibility !
ThomasS
1 / 5 (1) Aug 21, 2009
we will never-ever have a real invisibility cloak, people need to get over that.
Jeffhans1
not rated yet Aug 22, 2009
YOU ThomasS will never have an invisibility cloak perhaps, but making a blanket statement like that just shows you have not been paying attention to progress. How much has the US spent on making "Stealth" aircraft over the years? Having "Cloaked" special forces can negate many of the negative effects of fighting in an urban setting.

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