Research pokes holes in Hubbard model: Could help solve enigma of high-temperature superconductors

Aug 19, 2009

New UBC research has literally and figuratively poked holes in single-band Hubbard physics--a model that has been used to predict and calculate the behavior of high-temperature superconductors for 20 years.

The findings are the first compelling evidence challenging the model under certain conditions, and could necessitate entirely new theoretical approaches to explaining superconductivity in cuprate materials, one of the outstanding mysteries in condensed-matter physics.

"Single-band Hubbard physics has been used for 20 years to predict how superconducting cuprate materials accommodate the 'holes' left by electron removal," says Darren Peets, lead author of the study who conducted the research while a UBC doctoral student. "But now it looks like the approaches that underpin a large fraction of the theoretical work in the field just don't work across all the ranges of superconductivity we can study. The part of the cuprates' superconducting phase diagram we looked at could exhibit less-bizarre behaviour, or we could be seeing completely new physics, but in either case the usual theoretical approaches do not work here."

The findings were published today in the journal .

Cuprates normally act as insulators but become superconductors when electrons are removed--a process known as 'doping' holes into the material. Physicists consider a material optimally doped when it achieves at the highest, most accessible temperature.

UBC researchers where able to break the single-band Hubbard model by 'overdoping' a crystal cuprate superconductor past its optimal range--a level of doping that is difficult to achieve and very rarely studied. While the model explains the material's electron behaviour during doping, Peets and his team found the model falls apart as even more electrons are removed.

"By probing the using tunable-energy X-rays, we were able to show that this region accommodates electron holes in a fundamentally different manner, and that the interactions among the holes already in the material change completely."

Special crystal samples grown at UBC enabled the team to overdope the superconductor to a degree rarely possible with most materials. "Few materials exist in this doping range, and they tend to be very difficult to grow crystals of," says Peets. "In the case of these crystals, thallium oxide--which is toxic--boils off near growth temperatures if you allow it. So a fair bit of work and care is required."

Discovered in 1986, are cuprates--copper oxides. The materials, which exhibit superconducting properties at usually cold temperatures--often in excess of 90 kelvin--remain an enigma despite intense scrutiny. And because their superconducting state persists at more manageable temperatures, more commercial applications are feasible.

Source: University of British Columbia (news : web)

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User comments : 5

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Alizee
Aug 19, 2009
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Alizee
Aug 19, 2009
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vantomic
4.3 / 5 (6) Aug 19, 2009
please stop
Alexa
2.6 / 5 (8) Aug 19, 2009
Why these experiments weren't attempted to replicate by peer-reviewed press? Who is responsible for it?

http://www.iop.or...8/3/319/
http://www.lenr-c...Navy.htm

The silencing of opponents is the only strategy of mainstream science here.
out7x
1 / 5 (1) Aug 20, 2009
Excellent Scientific American article Aug.2009.
Nik_2213
5 / 5 (1) Aug 20, 2009
D'uh, why must folk invoke a new theory of *everything* to cope with something that workers in the field knew was probably only applicable to a limited range, anyway ? And couldn't account for the different varieties of SC ??

And why scream 'conspiracy' over work that is too cutting-edge and toxic for easy replication ? Thallium is scary at best, but volatile thallium compounds are almost malevolent...

My head hurts...
Alexa
not rated yet Aug 20, 2009
..that workers in the field knew was probably only applicable to a limited range..
Can you show us some publication, which presents such stance? I'm expert in this field and I found none.
..why scream 'conspiracy' over work..
Because here's no conspiracy at all.

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