Living longer and happier

Aug 19, 2009

A new study from the University of Missouri may shed light on how to increase the level and quality of activity in the elderly. In the study, published in this week's edition of Public Library of Science - ONE, MU researchers found that gene therapy with a proven "longevity" gene energized mice during exercise, and might be applicable to humans in the future.

"Aging is one of the biggest challenges to a modern society. A pressing issue in the elderly is the loss of activity. What one really wants is not a simple prolongation but rather a health span increase," said Dongsheng Duan, an associate professor of molecular microbiology and immunology. "After with a 'longevity' gene, we studied how well the mice performed on treadmill exercises. We found that the gene therapy worked well and the mice functioned better after the treatment."

Earlier studies have found that mice would live longer when their genome was altered to carry a gene known as mitochondria-targeted catalase gene, or MCAT. However, such approaches would not be applicable to human. Duan and Dejia Li, a post-doctoral researcher working with Duan, took a different approach and placed the MCAT gene inside a benign virus and injected the virus into the mice.

Once injected, Duan and Li tested the mice and found that they could run farther, faster and longer than mice of the same age and sex. Duan attributes this performance enhancement to the MCAT and believes the gene is responsible for removing toxic substances, known as free radicals, from the mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell. By using this specific gene therapy vector, the virus, to introduce the gene, Duan and Li opened the possibility of human treatment.

"Our results suggest similar therapy may one day improve the life quality of the elderly" Duan said. "This could have important implications for many diseases, such as , heart disease, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. These patients typically have too many toxic in their cells."

Source: University of Missouri-Columbia (news : web)

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Truth
not rated yet Aug 19, 2009
In humans, it is a well-documented fact that regular, scheduled exercise with weights and constant aerobic training works miracles as far as health is concerned. But the absolute major problem all these clinical trials have encountered is the problem of MOTIVATING not only seniors but just about anybody into activating and maintaining such an exercise regime. Many if not most people eventually get "tired" of the routine and give it up, hoping for the medical community to come up with some sort of miracle pill or other such artificial fix. That is very sad, because the secret of a happy and healthy old age is right there, hidden away with the weights in the closet that you once bought but eventually abandoned. So sad...
Nartoon
1 / 5 (1) Aug 20, 2009
If this works in humans they'll need to be able to test for it in athletic competitors.

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