Tumor size and level of visceral pleura invasion can impact survival of NSCLC patients

Aug 19, 2009

A study published in the August 2009 edition of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology found that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients could be more accurately staged at diagnosis by taking into account the level of visceral pleura invasion (VPI). VPI is the extension of a tumor beyond the elastic layer of the visceral pleura.

Researchers from the National Cancer Center East in Kashiwa, Japan conducted a review of data from the Japanese Joint Committee for Registration. After examining the records of 9,758 patients who underwent surgical resection in 1999, the patients were divided into nine groups based on tumor size and VPI.

The status of disease progression is determined through staging by measuring the presence of a localized tumor (T Status), presence of in the lymph nodes (N status) and metastasized tumors (M status). The TNM classification has several subgroups, or stages, that allow physicians to pinpoint the most accurate level of disease progression and develop a treatment plan. Using the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer's staging model, Junji Yoshida, MD and his team concluded that a 7cm or less with VPI should be upgraded to the next stage in T status.

"This research is extremely necessary in order to fine tune the lung cancer staging guidelines and be sure receive the most accurate staging and treatment," said Dr. Yoshida. "Accurate staging and course of treatment can impact the patient's prognosis tremendously."

Source: International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer

Explore further: New DNA technology may improve the treatment of aggressive childhood cancer

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New lung cancer staging system revealed

Jul 13, 2009

For the first time in more than 10 years, the universally accepted lung cancer staging system has been revised to more accurately reflect the prognosis for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

A new molecular marker of gastric cancer

Mar 30, 2009

Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common malignancies in the world with a high incidence and death rate. TNM staging system is used worldwide to predict prognosis and direct therapeutic decisions of patients with GC. ...

Recommended for you

Same cancer, different time zone

18 hours ago

Just as no two people possess the same genetic makeup, a recent study has shown that no two single tumor cells in breast cancer patients have an identical genome.

User comments : 0