Kinetic variable most useful for identifying malignant MRI-detected breast lesions identified

Aug 19, 2009

Breast MRI allows physicians to evaluate suspicious lesions using a variety of variables. Researchers have found though that computer-aided kinetic information can help significantly in distinguishing benign from malignant suspicious breast lesions on MRI, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).

In the study, performed at the University of Washington Medical Center, researchers analyzed and compared the computer-aided evaluation variables of 125 suspicious breast lesions. Three different kinetic curves (washout, plateau and persistent), were compared along with lesion morphology (size and shape). "We wanted to clarify which, of the many variables that reflect kinetics, were most predictive of malignancy, said Constance Lehman, MD, lead author of the study. "We found overlap in kinetic patterns across benign and , but we did determine that the "most suspicious" curve type, washout, was useful in separating benign from malignant lesions," said Dr. Lehman.

"Of lesions with the most suspicious curve type (any washout), 45.7 percent were malignant compared with 20.0 percent with plateau and 13.3 percent with entirely persistent enhancement," she said.

"We continue to study the specific features on MRI most predictive of . We know that the morphology of the lesion is extremely important, but our study also supports the use of kinetic features in lesion assessment. The "most suspicious" curve, washout, does seem to help distinguish benign from malignant lesions," said Dr. Lehman.

"In breast MRI, it is important to know which variables are most important for predicting malignancy because they help us in determining whether or not a lesion needs to be biopsied or not," she said.

More information: This study appears in the September issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Source: American Roentgen Ray Society

Explore further: Ice bucket challenge may change nonprofit world

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Melanomas may appear noticeably different than other moles

Jan 21, 2008

A preliminary study suggests that melanomas have a different appearance than other irregular skin moles (i.e., are “ugly ducklings”), according to a report in the January issue of Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives ...

Recommended for you

Obese British man in court fight for surgery

Jul 11, 2011

A British man weighing 22 stone (139 kilograms, 306 pounds) launched a court appeal Monday against a decision to refuse him state-funded obesity surgery because he is not fat enough.

2008 crisis spurred rise in suicides in Europe

Jul 08, 2011

The financial crisis that began to hit Europe in mid-2008 reversed a steady, years-long fall in suicides among people of working age, according to a letter published on Friday by The Lancet.

New food labels dished up to keep Europe healthy

Jul 06, 2011

A groundbreaking deal on compulsory new food labels Wednesday is set to give Europeans clear information on the nutritional and energy content of products, as well as country of origin.

Overweight men have poorer sperm count

Jul 04, 2011

Overweight or obese men, like their female counterparts, have a lower chance of becoming a parent, according to a comparison of sperm quality presented at a European fertility meeting Monday.

User comments : 0