Anti-Kadeer hackers mistakenly hit Australian arts site

Aug 07, 2009
Exiled Uighur leader Rabiya Kadeer, seen here on August 5, 2009. Hackers protesting against the Australian visit of Kadeer mistakenly crashed the website of an arts festival with a similar name, organisers said Thursday.

Hackers protesting against the Australian visit of exiled Uighur leader Rebiya Kadeer mistakenly crashed the website of an arts festival with a similar name, organisers said Thursday.

A group calling themselves Global Hack Attack hijacked the Melbourne International Art Festival's site, replacing the home page with a Chinese flag and message condemning Kadeer, a spokeswoman said.

"We like film but we hate Rebiya Kadeer!" the hackers wrote, in a screenshot seen by AFP.

"We like peace and we hate Rebiya terrorist! Please apologise to all the Chinese people.

"The manifesto of : maintains the reunification of the motherland, guards the national sovereignty."

Festival general manager Vivia Hickman said she suspected the attack had mistakenly been directed at their site instead of the Melbourne International Film Festival, which Kadeer was attending this week as a guest.

"I don't know if this is associated with what's happened with the film festival, our names are similar," Hickman said.

"It seems very strange and we have referred the matter to the police and they are looking at it."

Hackers have already hit the film festival's site twice in protest against the screening of Kadeer biopic "Ten Conditions of Love" and her associated visit.

The US-based leader of the World Uighur Congress, who China blames for inciting riots in Xinjiang region which killed at least 197 people last month, arrived here Tuesday despite strong protests from Beijing.

She denied instigating the unrest, and said Beijing was using her as a scapegoat to divert attention from the suffering of the mainly Muslim Uighur minority, who claim they have been persecuted since Chinese troops "peacefully liberated" the vast region 60 years ago.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: Tweet much to gain popularity is an inefficient strategy

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

China hackers crash Aussie film festival website

Aug 01, 2009

Chinese hackers crashed the website of Australia's biggest film festival, organisers said on Saturday, escalating tensions over a visit here by the exiled leader of the Uighur minority.

YouTube confirms website blocked in China

Mar 24, 2009

YouTube confirmed Tuesday its website was being blocked in China, although the California firm offered no explanation for why Chinese authorities were barring access to the popular video-sharing service.

Sri Lanka army website hacked: defence ministry

May 01, 2009

The Sri Lankan army's website has been targeted in a "cyber terrorism" attack by Tamil rebels, the defence ministry said Friday, and replaced with gruesome photos of apparent victims of the civil war.

Recommended for you

Tweet much to gain popularity is an inefficient strategy

39 minutes ago

The imbalanced structure of Twitter, where some users have many followers and the large majority barely has several dozen followers, means that messages from the more influential have much more impact. Less ...

Five ways to fight online abuse with good manners

1 hour ago

Online and social media's capacity to enable anyone to communicate their ideas and views is much celebrated. So why do so many people feel nervous about getting involved with online debate?

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.