Does Facebook usage contribute to jealousy in relationships?

Aug 06, 2009

The more time college students spend on Facebook, the more likely they are to feel jealous toward their romantic partners, leading to more time on Facebook searching for additional information that will further fuel their jealousy, in an escalating cycle that may become addictive, according to a study reported in CyberPsychology & Behavior.

Amy Muise, MSc, Emily Christofides, MSc, and Serge Desmarais, PhD, from the University of Guelph (Ontario, Canada), surveyed young adults involved in romantic relationships and found that those who spent time on social networking sites such as may be exposed to information about their partners that makes them jealous, leading them to spend more time involved in online surveillance and to uncover even more jealousy-provoking information.

The Rapid Communication, entitled "More Information than You Ever Wanted: Does Facebook Bring Out the Green-Eyed Monster of Jealousy?" describes a vicious cycle in which Facebook usage and feelings of jealousy become intertwined and have a negative influence on behavior and relationships. Some participants in the study described their increasing use of Facebook as "addictive." The authors recommend further research to explore this feedback loop and to determine whether a similar between online social networking and jealousy toward a partner affects older adults as well.

"This research on university age individuals is an excellent starting point to begin asking additional questions on how this new forum might be impacting the dynamics of adult relationships and other social processes," says Professor Dr. Brenda K. Wiederhold, Editor-in-Chief of CyberPsychology & .

More information: www.liebertpub.com/cpb

Source: Mary Ann Liebert

Explore further: Recurrent violence linked to substantially higher rates of mental disorders in post-conflict communities

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Is There a Relationship Between Facebook, Grades?

May 07, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- News in mid-April of an unpublished study suggesting that college students' use of Facebook was related to lower college academic achievement probably sent more than a few parents reeling. ...

Recommended for you

Cyber buddy is better than 'no buddy'

16 hours ago

A Michigan State University researcher is looking to give exercise enthusiasts the extra nudge they need during a workout, and her latest research shows that a cyber buddy can help.

Offenders turn to mental health services 

21 hours ago

Adult criminal offenders in Western Australian are eight times more likely than non-offenders to use community-based mental health services in the year before their first sentence, a UWA study has found.

Deliberation is staunchest ally of selfishness

21 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—Over the last two years, Yale psychologist David Rand and colleagues have investigated what makes people willing to help each other. Their latest research shows that while initial reactions ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Truth
not rated yet Aug 06, 2009
I got news for you. This phenomenon also occurs with much older users on other sites such as Myspace. I personally know of a number of women, all over the age of 40, who feel threatened and overwhelmed by their romantic partners "friends" whose pictures are shown on their home pages. I also know of one particular woman who not only became extremely jealous of her man's pretty friends, but also went as far as posting bitter and hateful messages on the girl's pages. I myself had to intervene to stop her from continuing the destructive behaviour.

More news stories

Sensors may keep hospitalized patients from falling

(Medical Xpress)—To keep hospitalized patients safer, University of Arizona researchers are working on new technology that involves a small, wearable sensor that measures a patient's activity, heart rate, ...

Fresh hope for preventing pneumonia in the elderly

There are calls for the frail and elderly not be be overlooked for vaccines against pneumonia this winter, with UNSW research challenging conventional wisdom on immunisation effectiveness in older patients.

Phase transiting to a new quantum universe

(Phys.org) —Recent insight and discovery of a new class of quantum transition opens the way for a whole new subfield of materials physics and quantum technologies.

Imaging turns a corner

(Phys.org) —Scientists have developed a new microscope which enables a dramatically improved view of biological cells.

NASA image: Volcanoes in Guatemala

This photo of volcanoes in Guatemala was taken from NASA's C-20A aircraft during a four-week Earth science radar imaging mission deployment over Central and South America. The conical volcano in the center ...