Google invites US soldiers to Voice telephone service

Aug 04, 2009
US soldiers spend their break browsing the internet at their base in Basra, 550 kms south of the capital Baghdad in June 2009. Google on Tuesday set out to recruit US soldiers as users of its Voice online telephone service, promising it would help military families stay connected.

Google on Tuesday set out to recruit US soldiers as users of its Voice online telephone service, promising it would help military families stay connected.

Google Voice employs Internet telephony technology to let users merge home, office and mobile phones into a single number.

It also allows people to make cheap international phone calls, send free SMS messages and provides transcripts of voicemail messages.

"For servicemen and women who are constantly on the move, having a single number and an easy way to retrieve messages from loved ones can be invaluable," said Army Sergeant Dale Sweetnam, who is working in Google's communications office as part of a fellowship program.

"Loved ones can call to leave messages throughout the day, and then when that service member visits an Internet trailer, all the messages are right there. It's like a care package in audio form."

Soldiers with .mil email addresses can sign up for the free service online at google.com/militaryinvite.

"I signed up for an account when I came to Google, and it's already making communications much easier here in the States," Sweetnam said in a message posted at the California-based Internet giant's website.

"I know when I return to combat, Google Voice will help make life a little more manageable."

In June, Google began expanding Voice service membership on an invitation basis. Google said soldiers that accept Voice invitations will get priority, with accounts working within 24 hours of sign-up.

The (FCC) continues an investigation into a decision by Apple and AT&T to reject a Google Voice application developed for the iPhone.

FCC chairman Julius Genachowski said "inquiry letters" were sent on Friday to Apple, AT&T, the exclusive carrier for the iPhone in the United States, and .

The FCC wanted to get "the facts and data necessary to make the best policy decisions on behalf of the American people," Genachowski said.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: Startups offer banking for smartphone users

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Google unveils SMS service for Africa

Jun 29, 2009

Google on Monday unveiled a new service designed to provide information via SMS text message to mobile phone users in Africa, where cell phones are prevalent but Internet penetration is low.

Google adds automatic translation to Gmail

May 20, 2009

Google added automatic translation technology to Gmail on Tuesday, allowing users of its email service to translate messages in another language with a single mouse click.

Google Tests Directory Assistance for Phones

Apr 08, 2007

Computer Web search leader Google stepped up an experiment to use speech recognition on telephones so consumers can ask for local information, in a challenge to directory assistance providers.

Recommended for you

Startups offer banking for smartphone users

Aug 30, 2014

The latest banks are small enough to fit in the palm of your hand. Startups, such as Moven and Simple, offer banking that's designed specifically for smartphones, enabling users to track their spending on the go. Some things ...

'SwaziLeaks' looks to shake up jet-setting monarchy

Aug 29, 2014

As WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange prepares to end a two-year forced stay at Ecuador's London embassy, he may take comfort in knowing he inspired resistance to secrecy in places as far away as Swaziland.

Ecuador heralds digital currency plans (Update)

Aug 29, 2014

Ecuador is planning to create what it calls the world's first digital currency issued by a central bank, which some analysts believe could be a first step toward abandoning the country's existing currency, ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

RayCherry
not rated yet Aug 05, 2009
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) continues an investigation into a decision by Apple and AT&T to reject a Google Voice application developed for the iPhone.

FCC chairman Julius Genachowski said "inquiry letters" were sent on Friday to Apple, AT&T, the exclusive carrier for the iPhone in the United States, and Google.

The FCC wanted to get "the facts and data necessary to make the best policy decisions on behalf of the American people," Genachowski said.


And I cannot use Skype over 3G from my iPhone either! Not fair! Waaaaaaah ah aha hah ...

My local operator (Optimus, Portugal) has blocked Skype from working unless the iPhone picks up a WiFi connection. It is obvious why they have done it, but they have not advertised the fact during pre-sales and reserve the right in their contract to 'disconnect' any other service that provides a similar functionality.

The sooner the data/vox (and IM/SMS/MMS) rates equalise the better for everyone.