US Marshals seize sanitizer for bacteria problems

Aug 02, 2009

(AP) -- Officers with the U.S. Marshals Service have seized all skin sanitizers and skin protectants, including ingredients and components, at Clarcon Biological Chemistry Laboratory's facility in Roy, Utah, the Food and Drug Administration said.

The FDA also warned the public Saturday not to use any Clarcon products because they contain and are promoted as antimicrobial agents that claim to treat open wounds, damaged , and protect against various infectious diseases. No cases have been reported to the FDA.

Clarcon voluntarily recalled the affected products, marketed under several different brand names, in June 2009, following an FDA inspection that revealed high levels of potentially disease-causing bacteria in the products.

The inspection also uncovered serious deviations from the FDA's regulations, including poor practices that permitted the contamination. The FDA's seizure of these products, along with their ingredients, occurred after Clarcon did not agree to promptly destroy them. The FDA said it is protecting the public by preventing these products from entering the marketplace.

"The FDA is committed to taking enforcement action against firms that do not manufacture drugs in accordance with our current good manufacturing practice requirements," said Deborah M. Autor, director of the FDA's Center for and Research Office of Compliance.

Clarcon produced and distributed over 800,000 bottles of these products in multiple regions of the country since 2007. Consumers should not use any Clarcon products and should dispose of them in their household trash.

Analyses of several samples of the topical antimicrobial skin and skin protectant products revealed high levels of various bacteria. Some of these can cause opportunistic infections of the skin and underlying tissues. Such infections may need medical or surgical attention and may result in permanent damage, the FDA said.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: Tax forms could pose challenge for HealthCare.gov

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

FDA seizes sexual enhancement products

Apr 10, 2008

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the seizure by U.S. marshals of more than 14,000 units of Shangai- and Naturale-brand diet supplements.

FDA cracks down on hydrocone products

Sep 29, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says it will start taking enforcement action against companies marketing unapproved hydrocodone products.

Some Total Body-brand products recalled

Mar 31, 2008

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the recall of certain flavors of Total Body Formula and Total Body Mega Formula due to safety issues.

FDA says product mislabeled, misleading

Nov 20, 2007

U.S. regulators seized about $2 million of potentially harmful eye products that contain a drug ingredient officials said could lead to decreased vision.

Recommended for you

Can YouTube save your life?

Aug 29, 2014

Only a handful of CPR and basic life support (BLS) videos available on YouTube provide instructions which are consistent with recent health guidelines, according to a new study published in Emergency Medicine Australasia, the jo ...

Doctors frequently experience ethical dilemmas

Aug 29, 2014

(HealthDay)—For physicians trying to balance various financial and time pressures, ethical dilemmas are common, according to an article published Aug. 7 in Medical Economics.

AMGA: Physician turnover still high in 2013

Aug 29, 2014

(HealthDay)—For the second year running, physician turnover remains at the highest rate since 2005, according to a report published by the American Medical Group Association (AMGA).

Obese or overweight teens more likely to become smokers

Aug 29, 2014

A study examining whether overweight or obese teens are at higher risk for substance abuse finds both good and bad news: weight status has no correlation with alcohol or marijuana use but is linked to regular ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

pres68y
not rated yet Aug 02, 2009
It's great that the FDA looks out for our safety with even the potential of any problem.
Too bad they are incapable of doing the same thing with infected animals...
In fact, they cannot even seem to determine if/where/when infected animals are put into our food supply.
What's wrong with this scenario?