Fresh meats often contain additives harmful to kidney disease patients

Jul 23, 2009
Fresh meats often contain additives harmful to kidney disease patients
This is Richard Sherman, M.D., of the American Society of Nephrology. Credit: none

Uncooked meat products enhanced with food additives may contain high levels of phosphorous and potassium that are not discernable from inspection of food labels, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society Nephrology (CJASN). This can make it difficult for people to limit dietary phosphorous and potassium that at high levels are harmful to kidney disease patients.

Kidney disease patients on dialysis must watch their intake of dietary phosphate so that their blood phosphate levels do not rise. This is important because high blood phosphate levels may cause premature death in . patients also must limit their intake of potassium, because high blood potassium levels can cause sudden death.

One growing source of dietary phosphorous and potassium is through "enhanced" fresh meat and poultry products. These foods are injected with a solution of water with sodium and potassium salts (particularly phosphates) as well as antioxidants and flavorings. While ingesting phosphates and potassium can be dangerous for dialysis patients, there is no requirement that these ingredients be included in nutrition labels. There also have been no studies on the levels of phosphates and potassium contained in fresh meat and poultry products that have been "enhanced."

Richard Sherman, MD, and Ojas Mehta, DO (University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School), examined the potassium and phosphate content in a variety of "enhanced" and additive-free meat and poultry products available in local supermarkets. They found that products that were labeled as "enhanced" had an average phosphate concentration that was 28% higher than additive-free products, with some products almost 100% higher. Potassium content was variable. Additive-free products all contained < 387 mg of potassium per 100 gm of protein while 5 of the 25 products with additives that were studied contained at least 692 mg of potassium per 100 gm of protein (maximum 930 mg/100 gm). most foods with phosphate and potassium additives reported the additives on the labeling; however, 8 of the 25 "enhanced" products included in the study did not list the additives.

"The burden imposed on those seeking to limit dietary phosphorus and potassium could be ameliorated by more complete food labeling by manufacturers," the authors wrote.

More information: The article, entitled "Phosphorus and Content of Enhanced Meat and Poultry Products: Implications for Patients Receiving Dialysis," will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on July 23, 2009, doi 10.2215/CJN.02830409 .

Source: American Society of Nephrology (news : web)

Explore further: Meta-analysis tests vitamin D supplementation for weight loss theory

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Can't judge food by its label

Feb 10, 2009

Advanced kidney disease patients have a list of foods they know to avoid because they naturally contain a high level of the mineral phosphorus, which is difficult for their compromised kidneys to expel. But researchers from ...

Dialysis safe for kidney patients' heart health

Jul 09, 2009

Dialysis treatments do not affect the heart health of kidney disease patients who have had a heart attack, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society Nephrology (CJASN ...

Low potassium linked to high blood pressure

Nov 09, 2008

As a risk factor for high blood pressure, low levels of potassium in the diet may be as important as high levels of sodium—especially among African Americans, according to research being presented at the American Society ...

Recommended for you

AMA examines economic impact of physicians

16 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Physicians who mainly engage in patient care contribute a total of $1.6 trillion in economic output, according to the American Medical Association (AMA)'s Economic Impact Study.

Less-schooled whites lose longevity, study finds

16 hours ago

Barbara Gentry slowly shifts her heavy frame out of a chair and uses a walker to move the dozen feet to a chair not far from the pool table at the Buford Senior Center. Her hair is white and a cough sometimes interrupts her ...

How to keep your fitness goals on track

16 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high.

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

PPihkala
not rated yet Jul 23, 2009
Gram is a measure of mass and it's shortened form is g, not gm. So write either 100g or 100 grams, but 100 gm is wrong. At least they have not made the other common mistake that some abbreviate microgram as mg or mcg, instead of it's proper way which is ug.

More news stories

Scientists make critical end-stage liver discovery

(Medical Xpress)—A team of researchers in the University of Arizona's College of Pharmacy has discovered a molecular pathway that could be key to creating new therapeutics that would slow or even reverse ...

Atom probe assisted dating of oldest piece of earth

(Phys.org) —It's a scientific axiom: big claims require extra-solid evidence. So there were skeptics in 2001 when University of Wisconsin-Madison geoscience professor John Valley dated an ancient crystal ...