Fla. governor approves plan to capture, kill Burmese pythons

Jul 16, 2009 By Curtis Morgan

By next week, the first of a select squad of python hunters will be ready to roll.

Florida Gov. Charlie Crist on Wednesday approved plans to begin capturing and killing Burmese python that have invaded the Everglades.

The governor called the program, similar to one used for "nuisance" alligators on state lands, important for protecting wildlife and the public.

"We've all seen that there's been a significant rise in the python population," Crist said. "That's of concern."

Scientists believe the snakes, likely offspring of pets released by owners or freed from cages or shops by Hurricane Andrew, primarily pose a threat to native species.

It won't be an open season on constrictors. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will issue a limited number of permits starting Friday. The program, run with the South Florida Water Management District, will focus on state marshes south of Lake Okeechobee.

Trappers, whom the FWC said would be confined to volunteer experts, will euthanize the captured snakes. They also will provide scientific data from weight to gut contents. Trappers would be able to sell the meat and skin, which has commercial value for shoes and other items.

FWC Chairman Rodney Barreto said the program would run through the winter, then be reviewed to determine if it was effective.

Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., also has called for an controlled hunt in Everglades National Park -- one run by "deputized" agents and volunteers. The National Park Service is working on its own plan.

Some scientists doubt hunting can control an estimated 100,000-plus snakes that can move freely in the vast wilds of South .

Barreto said efforts will need to include federal land to work. He also still hopes to establish a python bounty, which he called a "cost-effective" solution.

___

(c) 2009, The Miami Herald.
Visit The Miami Herald Web edition on the World Wide Web at www.herald.com/
Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

Explore further: GMO mosquito plan sparks outcry in Florida

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

From pythons to fungus, species invading US

Jul 08, 2009

(AP) -- A pet Burmese python broke out of a glass cage last week and killed a 2-year-old girl in her Florida bedroom. The tragedy became the latest and most graphic example of a problem that has plagued the ...

Recommended for you

'Tiger heavyweight' Nepal hosts anti-poaching summit

10 hours ago

Nepal's success in turning tiger-fearing villagers into their protectors has seen none of the endangered cats killed for almost three years, offering key lessons for an anti-poaching summit opening in Kathmandu ...

GMO mosquito plan sparks outcry in Florida

Jan 31, 2015

A British company's plan to unleash hordes of genetically modified mosquitoes in Florida to reduce the threat of dengue fever and other diseases has sparked an outcry from fearful residents.

Population genomics unveil seahorse domain

Jan 30, 2015

In a finding vital to effective species management, a team including City College of New York biologists has determined that the lined seahorse (Hippocampus erectus) is more a permanent resident of the we ...

Researchers develop new potato cultivar

Jan 30, 2015

Dakota Ruby is the name of a new potato cultivar developed by the NDSU potato breeding project and released by the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. Dakota Ruby has bright red skin, stores well and is intended ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.