Chilled-out animals: a lower risk for food poisoning

Jul 07, 2009
Chilled-out animals: a lower risk for food poisoning

(PhysOrg.com) -- Food poisoning bacteria become more invasive in animals that are stressed, according to new research from the University of Bristol in collaboration with the UK poultry industry. The results will be presented at the Society for Applied Microbiology summer conference in Manchester tomorrow [8 July].

Led by Professor Tom Humphrey from the University’s Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, the research examined the behaviour of Campylobacter in , of which there are approximately 400,000 cases of Campylobacter food poisoning in the UK each year.

Improperly cooked poultry is an internationally important infection vehicle, particularly because this organism can be found in chicken muscle. Studies on bacteria like Campylobacter are traditionally carried out in conditions which may not reflect the production environment. Research in many countries has shown that after transport, levels of like Campylobacter are higher in the gut of food animals than on the farm.

Work at Bristol has demonstrated that this may be associated with the release of the stress hormone noradrenalin. This hormone makes Campylobacter grow more quickly, become highly motile and invasive, leading to an increase in its ability to cause disease - its virulence.

A further finding in the studies at Bristol is that Campylobacter can interact with other organisms in the gut of food animals. When this happens it can become even more infective. The results of this study provide vital information to enable the control of infection in the production environment, making chicken safer and decreasing cases of .

Professor Humphrey said: “The UK poultry industry is working hard to control Campylobacter. It is essential that this effort is supported by UK scientists and that research involves industry and is relevant to commercial production.”

Provided by University of Bristol (news : web)

Explore further: Cell division speed influences gene architecture

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Fighting the spread of food poisoning

Oct 02, 2007

A Queensland University of Technology researcher has developed a new technique that can help scientists and clinicians quickly and cheaply diagnose the bacteria which causes the most common bout of food poisoning in Australia.

Was it the chicken salad or the swim?

Jan 26, 2009

A new study finds swimming, having a private well or septic system, and other factors not involving food consumption were major risk factors for bacterial intestinal infections not occurring in outbreaks.

Recommended for you

Cell division speed influences gene architecture

19 hours ago

Speed-reading is a technique used to read quickly. It involves visual searching for clues to meaning and skipping non-essential words and/ or sentences. Similarly to humans, biological systems are sometimes ...

Secret life of cells revealed with new technique

21 hours ago

(Phys.org) —A new technique that allows researchers to conduct experiments more rapidly and accurately is giving insights into the workings of proteins important in heart and muscle diseases.

In the 'slime jungle' height matters

21 hours ago

(Phys.org) —In communities of microbes, akin to 'slime jungles', cells evolve not just to grow faster than their rivals but also to push themselves to the surface of colonies where they gain the best access ...

Queuing theory helps physicist understand protein recycling

Apr 22, 2014

We've all waited in line and most of us have gotten stuck in a check-out line longer than we would like. For Will Mather, assistant professor of physics and an instructor with the College of Science's Integrated Science Curriculum, ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

PPihkala
not rated yet Jul 07, 2009
Is it surprising to note that stressed animals are more susceptible to become ill? We know this from people already. Immune system does work badly under stress. Both in humans and in animals.

More news stories

FDA proposes first regulations for e-cigarettes

The federal government wants to prohibit sales of electronic cigarettes to minors and require approval for new products and health warning labels under regulations being proposed by the Food and Drug Administration.

Brazil enacts Internet 'Bill of Rights'

Brazil's president signed into law on Wednesday a "Bill of Rights" for the digital age that aims to protect online privacy and promote the Internet as a public utility by barring telecommunications companies ...