Ill. cancer researcher wins $500K genetics prize

Jul 01, 2009

(AP) -- An 84-year-old University of Chicago researcher has won a half-million-dollar genetics prize for her pioneering work in showing that cancer is a genetic disease.

Dr. Janet Davison Rowley on Wednesday was named the 2009 winner of the Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation's 2009 genetics for her research on recurring chromosome abnormalities in leukemias and lymphomas.

Her work has improved understanding and led to new cancer treatments.

The $500,000 cash prize comes with no strings attached.

Rowley enrolled at the University of Chicago in 1940 at age 15, earning a medical degree. She married and raised four boys before launching her scientific career in 1962.

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Walid
not rated yet Jul 01, 2009
That sulks. My Grandfather and his brother both died of lung cancer. They were heavy smokers though, unlike me a non-smoker.
E_L_Earnhardt
not rated yet Jul 02, 2009
Cigarette smoke transfers more excited electrons, (heat), to broncal area than "pipe" or "chewing". It therefore excites more electrons! Nicoteen spray is used on most vegetables before harvest!