Tiny levels of carbon monoxide damage fetal brain

Jun 25, 2009

A UCLA study has discovered that chronic exposure during pregnancy to miniscule levels of carbon monoxide damages the cells of the fetal brain, resulting in permanent impairment. The journal BMC (BioMed Central) Neuroscience published the findings June 22 in its online edition.

"We expected the placenta to protect fetuses from the mother's exposure to tiny amounts of ," said John Edmond, professor emeritus of biological chemistry at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. "But we found that not to be the case."

The researchers exposed pregnant rats to 25 parts per million carbon monoxide in the air, an exposure level established as safe by Cal/OSHA, California's division of occupational health and safety.

Dr. Ivan Lopez, UCLA associate professor of head and neck surgery, tested the rats' litters 20 days after birth. born to animals who had inhaled the gas suffered chronic oxidative stress, a harmful condition caused by an excess of harmful free radicals or insufficient antioxidants.

"Oxidative stress damaged the baby rats' , leading to a drop in proteins essential for proper function," said Lopez. "Oxidative stress is a risk factor linked to many disorders, including autism, cancer, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Lou Gehrig's disease, multiple sclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We know that it exacerbates disease."

"We believe that the minute levels of carbon monoxide in the mother rats' environment made their offspring more vulnerable to illness," added Edmond. "Our findings highlight the need for policy makers to re-examine the regulation of carbon monoxide."

Tobacco smoke, gas heaters, stoves and ovens all emit carbon monoxide, which can rise to high concentrations in well-insulated homes. Infants and children are particularly vulnerable to carbon monoxide exposure because they spend a great deal of time in the home.

No policies exist to regulate the gas in the home. Most commercial home monitors sound an alarm only hours after concentrations reaches 70 parts per million--nearly three times the 25 parts per million limit set by Cal/OSHA.

Source: University of California - Los Angeles

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otto1923
not rated yet Jun 25, 2009
Right- tobacco. SMOKING MUST END. Check out the more ominous article over in Science Daily:

Smoking Linked To Brain Damage
ScienceDaily (June 23, 2009) %u2014 New research which suggests a direct link between smoking and brain damage will be published in the July issue of the Journal of Neurochemistry. Researchers, led by Debapriya Ghosh and Dr Anirban Basu from the Indian National Brain Research Center (NBRC), have found that a compound in tobacco provokes white blood cells in the central nervous system to attack healthy cells, leading to severe neurological damage. The research centers on a compound known as NNK, which is common in tobacco. NNK is a procarinogen, a chemical substance which becomes carcinogenic when it is altered by the metabolic process of the body ...etc.

QUIT!!! Now. Put it down and do not pick it up ever again.
brianweymes
1 / 5 (3) Jun 25, 2009
Id also be concerned about human farts. The average human expels about 700 mL of gasses in farts every 24 hours. About a tenth of that is carbon dioxide. If the farter breathes it in, nearly impossible not to in many cases when indoors, it would far exceed 25ppm for a brief time. Of course it only be for several breaths depending on the circumstance then be gone, but still it makes you wonder.
otto1923
5 / 5 (2) Jun 25, 2009
It's CO not CO2, smoker. Smoking also causes ADHD and dumfukedness.
E_L_Earnhardt
5 / 5 (1) Jun 26, 2009
The CO in AUTO Exhausts far exceeds tobacco. The backyard barbecue does its share. Burning leaves on the lawn fills the house. The old gas range is a culprit. Human anal exhaust DOES contain some CO. Admit some fresh air for baby, (if any found)!
otto1923
not rated yet Jun 27, 2009
So go suck a tailpipe. You all quit sooner or later, one way or the other. Why wait till you get really SCARED?

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