News startup expects 10 pct of Web readers to pay

Jun 24, 2009

(AP) -- A startup planning to sell news online thinks newspaper and magazines will be able to get money from about 10 percent of their Internet readers.

Journalism Online made the projection Wednesday in a meeting with reporters.

The venture, expected to debut later this year, is trying to help struggling newspapers and magazines generate more revenue by selling packages of online content from a variety of that it hopes to sign up.

Persuading Web surfers to pay for news is expected to be difficult because most newspapers and magazines have been giving away their online content since the 1990s. Other industry studies have assumed just 1 percent to 2 percent of people who visit Web sites are willing to pay for stories.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: Countries convene to plot Internet governance

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Brazil passes trailblazing Internet privacy law

11 hours ago

Brazil's Congress on Tuesday passed comprehensive legislation on Internet privacy in what some have likened to a web-user's bill of rights, after stunning revelations its own president was targeted by US ...

Research shows impact of Facebook unfriending

Apr 22, 2014

Two studies from the University of Colorado Denver are shedding new light on the most common type of `friend' to be unfriended on Facebook and their emotional responses to it.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Amazon Prime wins streaming deal with HBO

Amazon scored a deal Wednesday to distribute old shows from premium cable TV channel HBO to its monthly Prime subscribers, landing a blow on rival Netflix in the streaming video battle.

Is nuclear power the only way to avoid geoengineering?

"I think one can argue that if we were to follow a strong nuclear energy pathway—as well as doing everything else that we can—then we can solve the climate problem without doing geoengineering." So says Tom Wigley, one ...

Robot scouts rooms people can't enter

(Phys.org) —Firefighters, police officers and military personnel are often required to enter rooms with little information about what dangers might lie behind the door. A group of engineering students at ...

Cyber buddy is better than 'no buddy'

A Michigan State University researcher is looking to give exercise enthusiasts the extra nudge they need during a workout, and her latest research shows that a cyber buddy can help.