Study: CEOs not doing enough on social networks

Jun 24, 2009

(AP) -- A new study says top CEOs should do a better job managing their presence online, on social sites like Twitter and Facebook and even Wikipedia.

Sharon Barclay, who runs executive PR firm Blue Trumpet Group and the blog UberCEO, took Fortune's 2009 list of the top 100 CEOs and found what she calls a "miserable level of engagement" when it comes to social networks.

Barclay only found two CEOs with accounts, and only 13 had profiles on LinkedIn, the social network for professionals.

Though Barclay did not poll the CEOs themselves, she says the results question whether these executives are managing their online reputation.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Workers Get Paid More When They Work For Powerful CEOs

May 19, 2006

For workers at publicly held companies, it literally pays to have a very powerful boss. A new study found that entrenched CEOs – those who have more control rights in their company than all other shareholders combined -- ...

'Babyface' look can help black CEOs, study says

May 08, 2009

Black Fortune 500 CEOs with a "babyface" appearance are more likely to lead companies with higher revenues and prestige than black CEOs who look more mature, an upcoming study says.

Recommended for you

LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

3 hours ago

The career-focused social network LinkedIn announced Friday it has 300 million members, with more than half the total outside the United States.

Researchers uncover likely creator of Bitcoin

9 hours ago

The primary author of the celebrated Bitcoin paper, and therefore probable creator of Bitcoin, is most likely Nick Szabo, a blogger and former George Washington University law professor, according to students ...

White House updating online privacy policy

13 hours ago

A new Obama administration privacy policy out Friday explains how the government will gather the user data of online visitors to WhiteHouse.gov, mobile apps and social media sites. It also clarifies that ...

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

VOR
5 / 5 (1) Jun 24, 2009
ok normally I wouldnt bother but i just had to say this is about the stupidest thing ive ever seen. SCREW twitter and facebook, and the concept of "managing their online reputation". -the implication being that these are now REQUIRED. not so. hopefully never so. CEOs are rightfully judged by their history, experience, and performance. If you are investing/not investing based on a CEO's facebook page, you deserve to lose your money and miss opportunities. this crap takes the cake. congrats. 'stinking pile of rubbish' would be complementing this. a new study? a study? really? lol rotflmao. stfu! should read 'an overzealous self-interested opinion of a PR person that looked at a list'.
Corban
not rated yet Jun 24, 2009
Well duh. Their time is worth like $8000/hr. That's what secretaries are for.
BAS
not rated yet Jun 26, 2009
Right. And we should also study how many CEO's have bravely moved to the sagging trend (wearing pants low to show their underwear), that is just about as relevant.

More news stories

LinkedIn membership hits 300 million

The career-focused social network LinkedIn announced Friday it has 300 million members, with more than half the total outside the United States.

Researchers uncover likely creator of Bitcoin

The primary author of the celebrated Bitcoin paper, and therefore probable creator of Bitcoin, is most likely Nick Szabo, a blogger and former George Washington University law professor, according to students ...

Researchers successfully clone adult human stem cells

(Phys.org) —An international team of researchers, led by Robert Lanza, of Advanced Cell Technology, has announced that they have performed the first successful cloning of adult human skin cells into stem ...